Food Hall by Jani https://jani-foodhall.org/ Recipes and reports for wellness Thu, 17 Nov 2022 21:28:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.1.1 https://jani-foodhall.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/cropped-pineapple-with-sunglasses-background-32x32.jpg Food Hall by Jani https://jani-foodhall.org/ 32 32 Healthy Homemade Apple Pear Bread https://jani-foodhall.org/apple-pear-bread/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=apple-pear-bread https://jani-foodhall.org/apple-pear-bread/#respond Thu, 17 Nov 2022 21:28:51 +0000 https://jani-foodhall.org/?p=4878 Warm winter spices flavor homemade apple pear bread. An irresistible aroma will fill your kitchen while this healthy loaf bakes in the oven.   Family and guests coming to stay during the holidays will enjoy a slice of this moist, fruity bread. It’s perfect for breakfast or as a snack with coffee or tea. Ingredients:...

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Warm winter spices flavor homemade apple pear bread. An irresistible aroma will fill your kitchen while this healthy loaf bakes in the oven.  

Family and guests coming to stay during the holidays will enjoy a slice of this moist, fruity bread. It’s perfect for breakfast or as a snack with coffee or tea.

As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission from purchases made through links on this blog at no extra cost to you. Thank you!

Slices of apple pear bread with the loaf on a plate with a paisley pattern.
Slices of moist apple pear bread are studded with apple chunks. Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Ingredients:

  • 1 ¾ cups flour (1 cup whole grain + ¾ cup all-purpose)
  • 2 Tablespoons ground flaxseed
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon (or less) salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon allspice
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • 1 fresh pear, mashed (or use a 14.5-ounce can of sliced pears)
  • 1 apple, peeled, and cut into small cubes
  • 1 Tablespoon lemon juice
  • ½ cup canola oil
  • ½ cup low-fat dairy or plant milk
  • ¼ cup dark brown sugar, packed
  • ¼ cup brown stevia-blend sweetener, packed
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla
Ingredients for apple-pear bread labeled on a marble counter top
Apple pear bread contains several ingredients, but comes together quickly! Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Flour: If you’re in rush, use just one type of flour. Add some whole-grain goodness to your apple pear bread with whole-wheat pastry flour or white whole-wheat flour. If desired, use gluten-free in place of all the flour.

Flax adds anti-inflammatory omega-3 fats, fiber, and a subtle nutty flavor to the loaf.

Spicing: Cinnamon, allspice, and cloves add a warm wintry taste that is perfect for cold weather and the holiday season. 

Feel free to add your favorite warm spices, such as ginger, cardamom, nutmeg, star anise, etc! 

Pear varieties: Choose a ripe, soft pear with thin skin, like a Bartlett, for this recipe. You won’t need to peel them! Remove the peels from thick-skinned varieties, like D’Anjous and comice.

Bartlett pear with yellow skin but in half on white cutting board with a couple of brown eggs.
Bartlett pears have thin skins, so they don’t need to be peeled. Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Apple varieties: Galas and other apples with slightly softer flesh are best. But, use whatever is in your refrigerator! Unlike the pears, the apples should be peeled.

Canola oil: Any oil with a neutral flavor is fine and will help your bread stay moist. Melted butter has a good flavor, but will not help with moistness or health! The polyunsaturated fats in canola oil are good for heart health.

Sweetness: In the recipe, half the apple pear bread’s sweetness comes from a stevia-blend sweetener. It tastes and cooks like brown sugar. Double the amount of brown sugar if you want to leave out the stevia-blend sweetener.

How to make

Wash your hands well and spray a 9”x 5” loaf pan with non-stick baking spray. Set the oven to 350 degrees.

  1. Combine all the dry ingredients in a large bowl and whisk.

2. Prep the fruit by chopping the pear into small cubes. Put the pear cubes in a medium bowl. Reduce to mush with a potato masher.

Chop the apple into small cubes and add to the pear mush along with the lemon juice. Stir to blend and set aside.

3. In a medium bowl or large measuring cup, combine the canola oil, milk, stevia-blend sweetener, brown sugar, eggs, and vanilla. Whisk thoroughly, until the sugar is mostly dissolved. It’s okay if a few lumps remain.

4. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients. Pour the wet ingredients into the well and stir gently until just a few dry spots remain. 

5. Add the fruit and continue to stir until there are no more dry spots. Be careful not to beat the batter!

Chunks of apple and mushy pear being mixed with a red spatula into the light brown apple pear bread batter.
Stir the fruit into the batter, mixing lightly. Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

6. Pour into the prepared loaf pan and gently tap and move back and forth on the counter to remove any air bubbles.

Place in the oven and bake for 55 minutes to an hour.

Golden apple pear with a crack on top baking in a clear glass loaf pan inside the oven.
When it is finished baking, apple pear bread will be golden brown with a crack on the top. Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

When the loaf is finished baking, let cool on a rack. After 10 minutes, remove the loaf from the pan and continue cooling on the rack.

After another 10 minutes, you can glaze and serve the bread.

 If you plan to freeze the bread instead of eating immediately, let it sit at room temperature for at least an hour.

Ideas for delicious additions

Chopped toasted walnuts or pecans, dried cranberries or golden raisins: Mix these into the batter at the end when you add the fruit.

Ginger: Two tablespoons chopped crystallized, a teaspoon of powdered, or a tablespoon freshly grated.

Here’s how to add the different kinds of ginger when making the batter:

  • Combine crystallized ginger with the fruit at the end of the mixing.
  • Stir freshly grated into the wet ingredients.
  • Combine powdered with the dry ingredients. 

Nutrition bonuses per slice 🍞

Fiber: 4 grams from whole grains, flaxseed, apples, and pears.

Increased daily fruit intake: The 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend 1 ½ to 2 cups of fruit per day (p.33). Each slice contains about a ¼ cup of fruit.

💪🏽 Iron: Excellent source of iron for men and a good source for women.

Protein: 6 grams–not bad!

Anti-inflammatory antioxidants and dietary fats

🍐 Apples and pears offer nutrition benefits for chronic diseases. Many of their health-promoting nutrients are found in the skin. This includes antioxidant flavonoids and phytochemicals like quercetin and terpenoids

Many of these are in the peel. So, use a thin-skinned type of pear in this recipe, and don’t peel it! 

🍎 Apples contain chlorogenic acid in their flesh, which may help with cardiovascular health, obesity, and blood sugar management.

The good amount of fats in each slice are mostly better-for-you monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. They are linked to improving cardiovascular markers and eye health.

Storage

💧 Keep the bread at room temperature on the day it is baked. In the evening, wrap the loaf in foil or plastic or place it in a container and transfer it to the refrigerator. It keeps for two to three days (if it isn’t gobbled up first!).

♨ Gently reheat a full or half loaf in a warm oven (250 degrees). Microwave individual slices for 10 to 20 seconds at 80% power.

🧊 Freezing: Place an unglazed loaf in wax paper or plastic wrap. Cover with aluminum foil and freeze for up to three months. 

Apply Simple Glaze (recipe below) to thawed bread if desired. 

FAQs

  • Can I use grated apples instead of chopped ones?

Yes, grated apples are great!

  • Can I use canned pears instead of fresh?

Of course! Canned pears are easy to mash, but you won’t get as many nutrition benefits.

  • What about using overripe pears?

The apple pear bread recipe is perfect for overripe pears.

  • Can I make muffins instead of bread?

Yes. The recipe, however, makes more than a dozen muffins so that you may have extra batter. Bake muffins for about 20 minutes at 375 degrees in a convection oven.

  • Is apple pear bread good for you?

Generally, the answer is yes!

Rectangular loaf of deep golden apple pear bread on a paisley plate with fresh whole pears and apples next to the plate.
Use the recipe below to make a healthy loaf of apple pear bread! Credit: Jani H Leuschel

It has anti-inflammatory benefits. (See the nutrition bonuses above.) But, anyone with gluten sensitivity or celiac disease should use gluten-free flour.

Also, apple pear bread is not particularly low in calories or sugars, especially if you glaze it and don’t use a stevia-blend sweetener. With the sweetener, one slice is much lower in sugars than a bakery muffin or quick bread.

Made with confectioner’s sugar, the toothsome glaze adds 32 calories and 8 grams of sugar per slice.

🎁 Holiday gifting?

This loaf makes a lovely holiday gift. You could even make mini-loaves and freeze them until you are ready to give them away!

Other holiday gift ideas on the blog include:

Banana Dog Treats with Peanut Butter (for your best friend) 🐕‍🦺

Apple Butter (instructions for both instant pot and slow cooker)

East Asian Pear Butter

Roasted Tomato Chutney

Carb-conscious Brownies

All are healthy and delicious!

Rectangular loaf of deep golden apple pear bread on a paisley plate with fresh whole pears and apples next to the plate.
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Healthy Homemade Apple Pear Bread

An easy loaf flavored with warm spices and fall harvest fruits. Slice and enjoy this moist bread with your favorite hot beverage!
Course breads, Breakfast, brunch, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine American, British
Keyword fiber-rich, whole grain
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour 20 minutes
Servings 8 hearty slices
Calories 307kcal
Author Jani H. Leuschel

Ingredients

  • 1 cup whole-wheat pastry flour
  • ¾ cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 Tablespoons ground flaxseed
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon allspice
  • ¼ teaspoon cloves
  • 1 large pear finely chopped or mashed
  • 1 large apple, finely chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon lemon juice
  • ½ cup canola oil or other neutral-tasting vegetable oil
  • ½ cup low-fat milk use dairy or plant milk
  • ¼ cup dark brown sugar
  • ¼ cup stevia-blend brown sweetener like Truvia or Swerve
  • 2 eggs beaten
  • teaspoons vanilla

Simple Glaze

  • ½ cup confectioner's sugar
  • ½ teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 Tablespoon low-fat milk or use water

Instructions

  • Wash hands for 20 seconds before beginning the recipe.
  • Set oven to 350 degrees, and coat a loaf pan with non-stick baking spray.
  • In a large bowl, combine flours, ground flaxseed, baking powder and soda, spices, and salt. Whisk.
  • In a medium bowl, toss the mashed pear with chopped apple and the lemon juice.
  • In a large measuring cup or medium bowl combine the remaining ingredients and beat well.
  • Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour in the wet ingredients. Stir with a spatula or wooden spoon until there are only a few dry spots in the batter. Add the fruit and gently mix, but don't beat the batter!
  • Pour batter into the prepared loaf pan. Bake for 55 to 60 minutes. Test the loaf by inserting a skewer or knife in the center.
    It should come out clean, but a little damp with maybe a crumb or two sticking to it.
  • Remove the loaf from the oven and set it on a rack to cool for about 10 minutes. Then, remove the bread from the pan by turning the pan upside down. Continue to cool.
    If desired, make the Simple Glaze while the bread continues to cool.

Simple Glaze

  • Place confectioner's sugar and almond extract in a glass measuring cup or small spouted bowl.
  • Add milk or water a half a tablespoon at a time until the glaze is thin enough to run off the end of a spoon.
  • Pour glaze over the length of the apple pear loaf.
  • Slice and enjoy!

Notes

  • If your fruit is in large chunks, it may sink to the bottom of the loaf. Soft pears are easy to mash and will be incorporated easily into the grain of the bread.
  • Use gluten-free flour in place of all the wheat flour if you prefer it.
  • Don’t glaze the bread if you plan to freeze it for later.
  • To keep the confectioner’s sugar from lumping, pour it through a small strainer.
The glaze adds 32 calories per slice. You can cut that in half by substituting a ¼ cup of stevia-blend sweetener similar to a confectioner’s sugar for half the sugar.

Nutrition

Calories: 307kcal | Carbohydrates: 49g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 17g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 5g | Monounsaturated Fat: 9g | Trans Fat: 0.1g | Sodium: 148mg | Potassium: 192mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 12g | Vitamin A: 117IU | Vitamin C: 3mg | Iron: 2mg

Copyright © 2022 Jani H. Leuschel

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Pumpkin Protein Waffles–with tempting spice! https://jani-foodhall.org/pumpkin-protein-waffles/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pumpkin-protein-waffles https://jani-foodhall.org/pumpkin-protein-waffles/#comments Tue, 25 Oct 2022 21:43:40 +0000 https://jani-foodhall.org/?p=4817 Waffle hacking–to add extra nutrition–is very popular right now! Pumpkin protein waffles get their extra protein from egg whites, protein powder, and cottage cheese. You won’t be hungry for a long time after tucking into these treats! Your friends and family will relish their seasonal spicing and yummy pumpkin flavor. You’ll like putting well-rounded nutrition...

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Waffle hacking–to add extra nutrition–is very popular right now! Pumpkin protein waffles get their extra protein from egg whites, protein powder, and cottage cheese.

You won’t be hungry for a long time after tucking into these treats!

As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission from purchases made through links on this blog at no extra cost to you. Thank you!

Your friends and family will relish their seasonal spicing and yummy pumpkin flavor. You’ll like putting well-rounded nutrition on the table. 

Round, ragged edge waffle topped with whipped cream and syrup on a round blue-green plate with a small white pitcher full of brown syrup next to it on a whitish marble countertop sprinkled with craisins
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Not only is there extra protein, but the star ingredient, pumpkin, has antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals! But pumpkin is not the only healthy ingredient…read on! 

Ingredients

Dry and wet ingredients for pumpkin protein waffles with labels on a white marble background
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel
  • Flour: Use whole wheat pastry flour, all-purpose flour, or gluten-free
  • Protein powder: Plain or vanilla 
  • Ground flax
  • Baking powder
  • Pumpkin spice
  • Salt
  • Cottage cheese
  • Milk
  • Pumpkin puree
  • Canola or another neutral oil
  • 1 T brown or white Truvia, Swerve (stevia-based sugar substitutes), or regular sugar
  • Eggs + egg whites
  • Maple and vanilla extracts

Optional add-ins: Chopped pecans or walnuts, mini-chocolate chips, raisins or craisins

Flour: Whatever kind you choose, please fluff before measuring. Use a fork, and stir the flour in your bag or storage container, adding air and making it less compact.

Protein powder: Use pea, egg white, or whey, whichever type you prefer.

Baking powder: So the waffles fluff up.

Flax: Adds healthy, anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids.

Salt: A small amount brings out the sweetness in the waffles.

Cottage cheese: Choose 2% for less fat. It boosts the protein, taste, and texture of the waffles. 

Pumpkin puree: Be sure the can of pumpkin is puree and not pie filling. 

Milk: Use plant or dairy milk (or water). I like ultrafiltered milk because adds extra nutrition. Read about it here.

Canola oil: Any oil with a neutral taste should be fine. Sunflower or grapeseed oils are other good choices. Canola oil has healthy, polyunsaturated fats.

Truvia or Swerve brown sweetener or brown sugar: Truvia and Swerve both have a brown sugar lookalike made from stevia and erythritol. (You can find out more about erythritol here.) If you prefer, just use regular brown sugar.

Eggs + egg whites: Rich in protein and other nutrition. Whip the whites and fold them into the batter for exceptionally fluffy pancakes.

Pumpkin spice: This makes your waffles taste the best! If you don’t have any, sub one teaspoon of cinnamon, half a teaspoon of ginger, and one-fourth teaspoon each of nutmeg and cloves.

Maple and vanilla extracts: The maple flavor pairs well with the pumpkin, but if you can’t find it, triple the amount of vanilla.

Optional add-ins: Chocolate chips and pumpkin are a tried-and-tasty combo. Chopped, toasted walnuts or pecans and dried mini-fruits like craisins, raisins, and blueberries are yummy and nutritious.

How to Make

Wash hands and heat a waffle maker.

Whisk together the flour, ground flax, baking powder, salt, and spices in a large batter bowl with a spout. 

In a large measuring cup or medium bowl, combine the cottage cheese, pumpkin puree, canola oil, stevia blend sweetener or brown sugar, egg, and egg whites.* Beat until thoroughly blended. It will be a thick batter.

(Note: Wash hands again after handling eggs.)

Pour wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and gently combine until all ingredients are moist. There should not be any dry spots.

Now is the time to stir in any optional add-ins and/or fold in the egg whites if you whipped them.

Pour a fourth to half of the batter onto a hot waffle iron. How much batter is needed will depend on the size of your waffle maker. (Here is the simple Cuisinart waffle maker I used to make these waffles.)

Remove the waffle when it is steaming and releases easily. (If it sticks to the iron, it usually means that it’s not finished cooking.)

Keep warm in a low-temperature oven or serve immediately with your choice of toppings.

FAQs ❓❓❓

Black man in athletic shirt looking confused

Can I make pancakes out of the batter?

Sure. Double the amount of milk in the recipe. Pro tip: For pancakes, you can cut the amount of oil in half if you want!

Can I use almond flour?

Yes, but only for part of the flour. You can replace a quarter cup of wheat or gluten-free flour with almond flour. 

Do I have to use cottage cheese?

No! Plain Greek yogurt is a great, high-protein substitute. (Secret tip: Even water will result in a good-tasting waffle.)

Is flavored protein okay in the waffles?

It’s fine but will add sugar and of course, flavor. Vanilla protein powder works the best! 

How do I keep the waffles from sticking to the waffle maker?

Many waffle makers are non-stick, but sometimes, even these don’t release the cooked waffle properly. Brush the surface with melted butter or oil before adding the batter if you’re worried. It helps if the surface is fully heated before adding batter!

What happens if I leave out the protein powder?

The waffles will still taste great. (Some people even like them better!) Although you lose a few grams of protein, they will still extra protein from the cottage cheese, egg whites, and egg.

How to store and reheat

Place wax paper or parchment in between any uneaten waffles. Then, enclose up to three or four of these waffles in foil and place in a quart-size zip bag. Store in the freezer for up to three months. 

To reheat, remove as many waffles as desired from the zip bag and pop them into the toaster (or, you can microwave a frozen waffle for a minute). 

Toppings

Can of pumpkin spice whipped cream, jar of pumpkin spice, small white round dishes with walnuts and mini chocolate chips on light marble countertop with grayish hex tile backsplash

The following numbers are for two Tablespoons;

  • Real maple syrup: 110 calories and 26 grams of sugar
  • Sugar-free syrup: 5 calories and 3 grams of carbohydrate 
    • Check the label for sugar alcohols if you have poor digestion
  • Plain low-fat yogurt: 20 calories and 2 grams of carbohydrate
  • Plain low-fat (2%) Greek yogurt: 23 calories and 2 grams of carbohydrate 
  • Mini semi-sweet chocolate chips: 117 calories and 17 grams of carbohydrate 
    • 14 grams of sugar
  • Canned whipped cream: 15 calories and less than a gram of sugar
  • Canned pumpkin spice whipped cream: 15 calories and 1 gram of sugar

A single Tablespoon of butter adds 100 calories, 11 grams of fat (7 of these are saturated), and no carbohydrates.

If you have any apple butter lying around, it’s delicious on the waffles instead of syrup!

Fork with a bit of pumpkin waffle covered in syrup next to half-eaten waffle with whipped cream and apple butter
Pumpkin protein waffles taste great with apple butter (and whipped cream)! Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Aerosol whipped cream doesn’t add many calories or sugars. It tastes good and you won’t weigh down your waffle–not a bad choice!

Nutrition bonuses

Pumpkin protein waffles have plenty of excellent nutrition!

The star ingredient, pumpkin puree, doesn’t have many calories, and it keeps your waffle from getting dry. 

Pumpkin is a rich source of vitamin A and its antioxidant derivatives, alpha and beta carotene. It also supplies a good amount of iron, a mineral important for healthy red blood cells.

The antioxidants may help get rid of free radicals that can cause disease and premature aging. The iron helps to keep you from feeling fatigued. 

  • Pumpkin also has a little bit of vitamin C, which helps your body absorb iron.

These waffles are not low in carbohydrates, but they are not high either!

Each waffle supplies the following balanced nutrition:

  • 2 servings of carbohydrates, about 34 grams
  • Protein, about 16 grams
  • Low saturated fat: 2 grams per waffle
  • Low sugar: 5 grams per waffle
  • Excellent iron content: 3 grams per waffle
  • Healthy fats from the ground flaxseed and canola oil
  • Calcium from the milk and a little from cottage cheese

That does not include toppings!

Waffles (and pancakes) are like coffee. It’s what we add to them that can make them a diet dirigible!

Jani H. Leuschel

Cooking tips

Because the batter is thick, pumpkin protein waffles need a couple of extra minutes on the heat to finish cooking inside before you take them out of the waffle maker. 

Set the heat just below the hottest setting. After the waffle maker indicates they are done, wait a couple of minutes before removing them.

(They may burn on the outside before the inside is cooked if you use the hottest setting.)

Waffles should release easily from the grids, which are usually non-stick. If they don’t, the waffle has not finished cooking.

ragged edge, deeply golden round waffle with four sections and whipped cream on top
Pumpkin spice whipped cream is delicious on the waffles. Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

If you don’t plan to eat the waffles immediately, it’s okay if the middle is not completely set. When reheated, the waffles will be fully cooked. They also tend to cook more for a couple of minutes after they are off the heat.

What to serve with your waffles

In addition to any of the toppings above, you could add more protein as a side. How about a couple of slices of your favorite bacon or turkey or chicken breakfast sausages?

Any type of fruit is perfect with waffles. Sliced pears or apples are particularly nice, but orange slices, grapes, melon chunks, and berries are yummy, too!

More breakfast recipes

Try my Chocolate Protein Pancakes. They’re hearty, like these waffles, and delicious as breakfast or brinner.

And if you love chocolate, these Triple Chocolate Muffins are decadent but healthy.

Continuing on that theme, this Banana Bread with Oat Flour is full of melty chocolate chunks. 

Or, up your energy quotient with Maca Morning Cakes!

Round, ragged edge waffle topped with whipped cream and syrup on a round blue-green plate with a small white pitcher full of brown syrup next to it on a whitish marble countertop sprinkled with craisins
Print

Pumpkin Protein Waffles

Hearty seasonal breakfast waffles that go the distance with extra protein to keep you from feeling hungry!
Course Breakfast, brunch
Cuisine American
Diet Low Fat
Keyword grains, phytonutrients, protein
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 297kcal
Author Jani H. Leuschel

Equipment

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Wash hands carefully for 20 seconds before starting to cook waffles.
  • Heat your waffle maker.
  • Combine flour, baking powder, spices, and salt with a whisk in a large, spouted batter bowl.
  • In a medium bowl or quart-size measuring cup, combine cottage cheese, pumpkin puree, canola oil, brown stevia sweetener, egg whites*, whole egg, and extracts. Beat well.
  • Add the wet to the dry ingredients and mix lightly with a large whisk, wooden spoon, or spatula until there are no dry spots. Your batter will be thick and slightly lumpy,
  • Stir in any add-ins like mini chocolate chips, craisins, or nuts.
  • Pour a fourth of the batter onto your waffle maker, (If you have a mini waffle-maker, use your judgment, but don't pour to the edges.)
    Put the lid down and cook waffle until it is crisp on the outside. This may take extra time because of the pumpkin puree.
    If the lid on your waffle maker gives resistance and does not open easily, your waffle is not cooked!
  • Serve waffles hot with toppings, such as maple syrup, sugar-free pancake syrup, lightly sweetened yogurt, and fresh fall fruits like ripe pears, apples, or orange slices.

Notes

The batter for these waffles is very thick. So, they will take a couple of extra minutes in the waffle maker to finish cooking in the middle. Leave them past the time the waffle maker beeps or indicates they are done.
You can leave the protein powder out of these waffles and they will cook up and be delicious although they will lose a few grams of protein.
🥚 *For even more volume, you can whip the egg whites. Fold them into the batter after mixing the wet and dry ingredients. 
 

Nutrition

Calories: 297kcal | Carbohydrates: 34g | Protein: 16g | Fat: 12g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 4g | Monounsaturated Fat: 6g | Trans Fat: 0.03g | Potassium: 1mg | Fiber: 4g | Sugar: 5g | Iron: 3mg

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Corn and Sausage Chowder using evaporated milk https://jani-foodhall.org/corn-and-sausage-chowder-using-evaporated-milk/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=corn-and-sausage-chowder-using-evaporated-milk Wed, 05 Oct 2022 19:55:36 +0000 https://jani-foodhall.org/?p=4727 This old-fashioned corn and sausage chowder is a hearty bowl of comfort. Evaporated milk makes it taste creamy and delicious. With an easy prep, it can be ready to slurp in about 45 minutes, start to finish. The recipe has a few more veggies and less fat than many other chowders, but you can take...

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This old-fashioned corn and sausage chowder is a hearty bowl of comfort. Evaporated milk makes it taste creamy and delicious.

With an easy prep, it can be ready to slurp in about 45 minutes, start to finish.

The recipe has a few more veggies and less fat than many other chowders, but you can take it in a richer direction if you want. (Read on to find out how!)

Want to make it in the slow cooker or Instant Pot? See the full recipe for instructions.

As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission from purchases made through links on this blog at no extra cost to you. Thank you!

White bowl full of amber colored soup containing corn, bulk sausage bits, and potatoes with skins, with shreds of orange and white cheese flotaing on top. Spoon sticking bowl on colorful orange-white patterned napkin
Sausage and Corn Chowder using Evaporated Milk Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Ingredients

Onion, salt crystals, black pepper, bay leaf, carrot, celery, cubed potatoes with skins on, tube of turkey sausage, can of corn, broth, and milk on a bluish backgroud: Labelled ingredients for Corn and Sausage Chowder
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel
  • Ground sausage meat: turkey or pork
  • ½ large onion
  • 1 large celery stalk, chopped
  • 1 large carrot, chopped
  • 1 large russet potato, cut into medium chunks
  • 1 bay leaf
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 3 cups broth (low sodium, if possible)
  • 1 (15-ounce) can of corn (use 2 cups of frozen or fresh corn, if desired)
  • 1 (12-ounce) can of 2% evaporated milk
  • 2 Tablespoons cornstarch
  • 2 Tablespoons cold water
  • Shredded Colby-Jack Cheese for serving

🦃 Sausage: Turkey sausage saves you fat and calories. It’s a healthy choice for those with diabetes or heart disease and for your waistline. No need for anything fancy. Use a tube of sausage meat like Jimmy Dean, Jennie-O, or a store brand.

🥕 Onion-celery-carrot: Sometimes called mirepoix, this traditional blend of vegetables is a classic soup starter. The veggies add vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, and fiber!

🥔 Potatoes: I like russets because they are often less expensive. Plus, they fall apart after a long simmer, thickening the soup. Waxy small potatoes, such as gold or red varieties, are also fine.

🌿 Seasonings: That distinctive chowder flavor comes from bay leaf! You can add half a teaspoon of a dried herb like marjoram or thyme to boost the taste even more.

Broth: Use veggie or chicken broth or water. If you use water, it may be necessary to increase the salt in the recipe.

🌽 Corn: I like the convenience of canned corn. Just drain, and rinse off the extra sodium before adding it to the soup. Frozen corn, thawed and drained, is also fine.

🥛 Evaporated Milk: Choose the 2% variety to save fat. It still tastes rich and creamy. Or, if fat is not a concern, substitute whole milk, half-and-half, or heavy cream.

Cornstarch: It makes your chowder thick, and it’s gluten-free.

🧀 Colby-Jack Cheese: The shreds make a delicious garnish!   

How to make

Start by browning the sausage in a Dutch oven or deep, high-sided 5-quart pan.

Remove the cooked meat, leaving the drippings.

Add the chopped onion-celery-carrot to the hot drippings. Cook until the onion becomes translucent (see-through). Add the potatoes and cook for about three minutes.

Crumbled turkey sausage atop briefly cooked potato cubes and chopped onion, celery, and carrot in dark Dutch oven on stovetop in tan and beige granite countertop

Return the cooked sausage to the pan.

Add the bay leaf and seasonings and cook for a minute, until the bay leaf is fragrant.

Cooked sausage crumbles, potato cubes, celery, carrot, and onion bits float in a brownish broth in Dutch oven on a gas burner, Colander of corn on the side

Pour in the broth or water, scraping up any browned bits from the bottom of the pan.

Bring to a boil and then, lower heat and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes, until potatoes are barely tender.

Stir in the corn and evaporated milk and heat for about 10 minutes to mingle the flavors. You can simmer, but do not boil.

Mix the cornstarch with the cold water and whisk into the soup to thicken. Taste; add extra salt or pepper if desired.

Serve in large mugs, crocks, or bowls, with a Tablespoon or two of cheese on top.

  • For slow-cooker and Instant Pot directions, see the notes in the full recipe below.

What to serve with it

A green salad and cornbread or crusty French loaf are all that’s needed on the side. One reason you’ll love this soup is that it is almost a meal in one!

This recipe for Simple Green Salad just might come in handy!

How to store 

❄ Corn Chowder with Sausage will keep in a sealed container in the refrigerator for three days. 

If you plan to freeze it, don’t add the milk or cornstarch until you thaw and reheat because the texture will suffer. The dairy-free base will keep in the freezer for three to six months.

How to reheat

♨ Warm a single bowl or cup of soup in the microwave (covered with a damp paper towel) on 80% power for a minute and a half to two minutes. Stir to distribute the heat. Top with cheese.

(Keep in mind that power levels and wattage on different models of microwaves vary. So, you may need a few seconds more or less.)

To serve your family, warm in a pan on the stovetop until the chowder barely begins to break a simmer. DO NOT BOIL!

Off-white and Creamy Corn and Sausage Chowder Using evaporated milk in a dark Dutch oven on the stovetop
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Thaw any frozen soup overnight in the refrigerator. Proceed with the recipe from the point of adding the evaporated milk and then, the cornstarch to make your soup thick.

Why you’ll keep this chowder recipe in your backpocket

With inflation sending food costs soaring, this chowder feeds your family for less than 10 dollars!

Most of the ingredients are already in your pantry, fridge, or freezer. You probably have onion, celery, and carrots on hand, and maybe canned or frozen corn and evaporated milk.

Sausage is all you need to add to the grocery list. (Unless it’s in your freezer.)

(Did you know that canned and frozen foods are good for your health and your wallet? Read all about their nutrition virtues at Love Canned Food.)

The chowder tastes rich, creamy, and yummy with the sagey flavor of sausage and the sweetness of corn. Kids and adults enjoy this chowder!

Nutrition bonuses

This recipe is NOT low-fat, but it’s lower fat than most other chowder recipes.

  • Gluten-free: It’s suitable for people with celiac disease diets and anyone with gluten sensitivities.
  • Vitamins and minerals: It’s an excellent source of calcium and potassium. Because evaporated milk is fortified, the chowder has more than half the vitamin A needed by an adult woman, as well as a decent amount of vitamin D.

FAQ

Can I make this soup vegetarian? Yes! Add an extra can of corn and extra cheese on top or use vegetarian sausage in place of the turkey or pork sausage.

Can I use plant-based milk instead of evaporated milk? Yes; sub in any type except for coconut milk, which will change the flavor too much.

Can I use regular milk, cream, or half-and-half? Of course! But, for best taste do not choose 2%, 1%, or non-fat milk. You can also increase the milk to two cups instead of one and a half (12 ounces).

Can I add other vegetables? Peas and green beans are great in this soup. Avoid leafy greens, tomatoes, and any type of vegetable that is watery.

Can I add more spices? Nutmeg, cayenne or hot sauce, garlic–all give the soup a bit more depth. Sometimes, I like to use whole black peppercorns instead of ground black pepper. 

Can I thicken the chowder without cornstarch? Yes. Make a slurry by mixing flour with cold water in a two-to-one ratio until smooth. Whisk in at the end of cooking. Of course, this adds gluten.

🍲 Other soups you might like

White bowl with thick amber soup topped with orange and white shreds of cheese in a white bowl with a spoon sticking out on a colorful orange white patterned cloth napkin with a small white plate in upper left corner with a brown edge of a roll. On a wood-grain counter top
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Corn and Sausage Chowder using Evaporated Milk

Inexpensive, yummy, hearty soup that makes dinner out of a can of corn and sagey bulk sausage.
Course Dinner, Mains, Soup, Stew
Cuisine American
Diet Diabetic, Gluten Free
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Servings 6
Calories 274kcal
Author Jani H. Leuschel
Cost $6-$9

Equipment

Ingredients

  • 1 pound turkey or pork sausage; raw ground sausage like Jimmy Dean or Jennie-O
  • ½ large onion, chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, chopped
  • 1 large carrot, chopped
  • 1 large russet potato, with skin on, cut into chunks
  • 1 bay leaf
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 3 cups broth or water
  • 1 15-ounce can corn
  • 1 12-ounce can 2% evaporated milk
  • 2 Tablespoons cornstarch
  • 2 Tablespoons cold water
  • ½ cup Colby-Jack cheese shredded for topping

Instructions

  • Wash hands carefully for 20 seconds.
  • Heat a large, deep saucepan or Dutch oven to medium-high and brown sausage, breaking it up into crumbles. No pink should remain.
    Remove browned sausage to a plate lined with paper towels.
    (Use non-stick spray on the pan if using turkey sausage.)
  • Saute the onion, celery, and carrot in the pan juices of the sausage.
    Note: If using pork sausage, pour off some of the oil and juice before adding vegetables.
  • Mix the potato chunks with the vegetables, and cook briefly.
    Return the sausage to the pan. Add the bay leaf, salt, and pepper and stir to heat spices and coat with pan juices.
  • Pour in the broth and scrape up any brown bits stuck to the bottom of the pan. Bring to a boil, then, lower the heat and simmer for 15 minutes. The potatoes should be tender.
  • Add the corn and stir. Then, pour in the milk and heat to a simmer for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  • Mix the cornstarch with water until it dissolves. Stir it into the chowder bit by bit. The soup should thicken.
  • Lower the heat and taste. Adjust the salt and pepper if needed.
  • Serve in bowl or mugs topped with a little shredded cheese.

Notes

🧂 The sodium in this recipe is high. You can cut it by using low-sodium broth, leaving out the salt, and rinsing the corn. Using water rather than store-bought broth will also help. 
👀 Watch the heat when sauteing the onion-carrot-celery. The vegetables burn easily.


♦ Instant Pot-multicooker Instructions:

  • Set the Pot to Saute for 10 minutes. Spray with non-stick oil (avocado, if possible) if using turkey sausage.
  • Cook sausage until no longer pink and add vegetables except for potatoes. Cook until the onion is translucent. Add potatoes and seasonings, and stir well.
  • Add broth and put the lid on, turning it to lock. Seal the vent and set it to cook at high pressure for 4 minutes. Rapid release the pressure at the end of cook time. 
  • Remove the lid and stir in evaporated milk. Cook on the low Saute setting for 5 minutes. (If chowder starts to boil vigorously, cancel the Saute and choose the Keep Warm setting.) 
  • Mix cornstarch with water and whisk into chowder. Serve thickened chowder immediately.
 

♦ Slow Cooker Instructions:

  • After browning the sausage, pour it into a slow cooker with drippings. Top with onion, celery, carrot, potatoes, and seasonings. Decrease the broth or water to 2 cups and pour into the cooker, over the sausage and vegetables. 
  • Cook on low for 6 hours. Stir in the corn and evaporated milk. Turn the heat to high.
  • When the chowder begins to boil, dissolve the cornstarch in the water. Whisk in the cornstarch mixture and turn the heat to low or warm once the soup thickens.
 

Nutrition

Calories: 274kcal | Carbohydrates: 22g | Protein: 22g | Fat: 11g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 3g | Trans Fat: 0.3g | Cholesterol: 67mg | Sodium: 1149mg | Potassium: 411mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 6g | Vitamin A: 2229IU | Vitamin C: 5mg | Calcium: 252mg | Iron: 1mg

Copyright © 2022 Jani H. Leuschel

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Date Scones https://jani-foodhall.org/date-scones/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=date-scones https://jani-foodhall.org/date-scones/#comments Wed, 14 Sep 2022 18:38:16 +0000 https://jani-foodhall.org/?p=4658 Here’s a date scone recipe in honor of the UK’s Queen Elizabeth II, whose state funeral is Sept. 19. This easy bake with British roots is a delicious pick-me-up with a cup of tea in the afternoon. It also makes a filling breakfast. As nature’s candy, dates are sweet and healthy; qualities of the late...

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Here’s a date scone recipe in honor of the UK’s Queen Elizabeth II, whose state funeral is Sept. 19. This easy bake with British roots is a delicious pick-me-up with a cup of tea in the afternoon. It also makes a filling breakfast.

As nature’s candy, dates are sweet and healthy; qualities of the late queen, who lived to be 96. 

As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission from purchases made through links on this blog at no extra cost to you. Thank you!

A good scone will include butter and sugar on the ingredient list. However, this Date Scone has a moderate amount of butter and a smidge of sugar. Most of the sweetness comes from the dates.

Close up of wedge-shaped date scones on parchment paper
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Read on to find out more and get the deets on date nutrition.

Ingredients:

ingredients for date scones shown measured in clear glass and white porcelain containers plus a measuring cup with milk and half a stick of butter on a white marble background
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel
  • ¾ cup milk
  • 1 t vinegar
  • 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 cup white flour
  • 1 ½ T sugar
  • 1 ½ t baking powder
  • ¼ t salt
  • ¾ t cinnamon
  • 1 egg
  • 1 t vanilla
  • 1 cup chopped dates
  • 4 T butter, frozen

Milk: Use your favorite dairy or plant-based milk. Bear in mind that fat-free milk will not contribute much to the flavor or texture of the pastry, while heavy cream will add more saturated fat.

Vinegar: Feel free to sub lemon juice.

Flours: Whole-wheat pastry flour is not heavy and has beneficial minerals and fiber. To create fluffy pastry, it’s best not to substitute regular whole wheat flour.

If you want to use up to half a cup of almond flour, that’s fine. The scones will also bake up deliciously with standard gluten-free flour.

Sugar: There’s not much in the recipe, but you can use a sugar-free granular sweetener made from erythritol and/or stevia instead of sugar. If you prefer honey or maple syrup, measure in the same ratio and add it to the wet ingredients.

Read more about erythritol sweeteners!

Dates: In the grocery stores, you’ll find Medjool and Deglet Noor. Either is fine. Deglets tend to have slightly less fruit meat.

Butter: If you want to minimize saturated fat in the scones, replace half the fat with butter-flavor shortening. Your dough will be easier to handle.

How to make 👩🏽‍🍳

Sour the milk by adding vinegar (or lemon juice) and place it in the refrigerator.

Adding clear white vinegar to milk in a measuring cup, close up
Sour the milk with a little vinegar or lemon juice. Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Combine the dry ingredients in a large bowl, and stir with a whisk.

Add egg and vanilla to sour milk, and beat lightly with a fork to break up the egg. Stir in and separate the date pieces with a fork. Return the wet ingredients to the fridge.

Grate the frozen butter into the dry ingredients. Blend into the flour with a pastry cutter. You will not get a fine, sandy mixture. It will be rather dry with pebble-like pieces here and there.

Make a well in the center of the butter-flour mixture and pour in the wet ingredients. Stir to make a rough dough.

Turn dough out onto a floured surface and knead just a few times. The dough should hold together and not look ragged.

Shape into a circle about 1½ inches thick. Use a floured knife, dough scraper, or pizza cutter to cut like a pizza or pie into eight wedges.

Using your dough scraper or a pie server transfer wedges to a parchment-lined baking sheet.

Place the baking sheet in a 400 F convection oven (425 F regular oven). Start checking the scones for doneness at about 13 minutes. Tops should be light- to medium-golden brown. Bake no more than 15 minutes.

Date scones on baking sheet lined with parchment baking in the oven
The scones should be golden brown. Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Remove. Let cool for 5 minutes, then place on a rack to finish cooling. Eat soon or freeze for another day.

✱Food Safety note: Flour and eggs can contain bacteria like Salmonella, E. coli, and other toxins. After handling raw flour or eggs, be sure and wash hands and contact surfaces with hot, soapy water. Never eat raw dough!

What to serve with scones

A cozy, hot beverage like tea is lovely with scones as an afternoon pick-me-up. Black caffeinated teas like Earl Grey and English Breakfast are energizing. Soften their tannic bite with a drop of milk or cream. Lemon is nice, too.

Pottery mug with vibrant southwest colors, wedge scone on small plate flanked by small white ceramic round dishes of jam on marble countertop
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Green teas tend to be milder, as are oolong, and rooibos. Peppermint and other herbal teas are mellow and healthy.

Coffee is great, too. (Scones are practically required snacks in coffee shops!)

Eat your scone plain or dress it up with butter, preserves, or honey. Clotted cream and lemon or orange curd are excellent additions for special occasions.

Troubleshooting

🥶 Ingredients should be very cold (but not frozen except for the butter) so your scones will be fluffy inside and crispy outside.

If your dough seems too crumbly, add another tablespoon or two of milk. However, the dough should look a little dry in the bowl. It will seem wetter when you start to knead and shape it.

To keep the dough from sticking, use floured hands to knead and shape. Flour your tools as well as the work surface.

That said, try not to overwork the dough. Contact with hands should be for as little time as possible.

Too much kneading and/or working in the butter with fingers will make for rock-like scones. Yuck! 😝

Watch your scones at the end of baking time. They will continue to cook for a short time after they come out of the oven. Overbaking will make them dry and crumbly.

How to store and make ahead

❄ To make scones ahead, prepare the dough to the point of cutting wedges. Then, put the unbaked wedges in the refrigerator–perhaps the night before you want to eat them.

Bake them in the morning. Because they are very cold, they may take a couple of minutes longer in the oven. Remove them from the fridge when preheating the oven.

🧊 Or, if you want to eat them much later, freeze unbaked scones on a tray. Once they are hard, you can pile them into a freezer bag. Remove as many as desired when you want to bake and eat them.

Of course, they will take longer to bake from frozen.

How long will they keep?

Baked scones: They will be fine at room temperature for a day or two. They will taste best, however, if eaten on the day they are baked. 

  • To warm, heat scones briefly in a 350 F oven.
  • Microwave at 60 to 80% power for 20 seconds.

Freeze them wrapped in foil or plastic and enclosed in a zip-top bag for up to 3 months.

Raw scones: For the best flavor, bake and eat within three months. They should keep in a deep freeze for up to six months.

Variations

three dates on a yellow and red striped kitchen towel
  • Orange and Date Scones: Add a tablespoon of orange zest to the wet ingredients.
  • Walnut and Date Scones: Add half a cup of toasted, chopped walnuts to the dry ingredients.
  • Pecan and Date Scones: Ditto with pecans instead of walnuts.
  • Vegan Date Scones: In place of dairy milk, use plant-based milk, and substitute with a flax egg or egg replacer.

*To make a flax egg, mix a Tablespoon of ground flaxseed with three Tablespoons of water. Let sit for five minutes before using in recipe.

Quicker scones

The recipe below is for a basic date scone. It saves time with fewer ingredients. Use one kind of flour; leave out the vinegar, egg, vanilla, and cinnamon. Increase the milk to 1 cup. Double the baking powder.

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup of chopped dates
  • ¼ cup of frozen butter
  1. Combine dry ingredients. 
  2. Add the dates to the milk and stir with a fork to separate the sticky dates.
  3. Grate frozen butter into dry ingredients and work in with a pastry cutter.
  4. Make a well in the center of the flour-butter mixutre and pour in the date-milk.
  5. Stir to make a dough and turn out onto flour surface and proceed to shape and cut.

See the full recipe below for more instructions on working with the dough!

Nutrition bonuses

Dates are sticky-sweet. (Yum!) They are high in carbohydrates and sugars, but have a low glycemic index. This means they won’t quickly raise your blood sugar quickly despite their sugary taste.

Here are the facts for 100 grams or 3.5 ounces.

(Slightly less than the amount in the Date Scone recipe)

  • Calories: 280
  • Carbohydrate: 75 grams
  • Fiber: 7-8 grams (depends on the type of date)
  • Protein: 2 grams
  • Calcium: 40-65 mg (depends on the type of date)
  • Potassium: 700 mg

Dates also contain B vitamins and are a good source of minerals like copper, magnesium, and manganese.

Source: FoodData Central, USDA*

Vitamin P (phytonutrients)

Dates are full of health-giving flavonoids, carotenoids, and phenolic compounds. Sometimes called vitamin P, these are plant-based nutrients that help fight disease through antioxidant, antimicrobial, and other anti-inflammatory processes.

When eaten regularly, dates:

  • fight cancer
  • benefit eye health
  • improve brain health
  • ease labor and delivery
  • protect the kidneys

(Information from Healthline and PubMed.)

They may also help with managing blood sugar and cholesterol although there is less research in these areas.

Holy bonuses 😲

Dates have been cultivated for at least 6,000 years.

  • Islam: Dates are traditionally eaten to break the fast of Ramadan.
  • Judaism: Dates are one of the seven holy fruits in the celebration of Palm Sunday.

Other scone recipes to enjoy

Try these very British Earl Grey Tea Scones to ease the loss of Queen Elizabeth, one of the world’s great leaders and peacemakers. They have a tea glaze and infuse the kitchen with the delightful scent of bergamot.

Or, if you have a few, juicy late-season blackberries, make these easy-peasy (and super healthy) Blackberry Scones. They come together very quickly!

Pottery mug with vibrant southwest colors, wedge scone on small plate flanked by small white ceramic round dishes of jam on marble countertop
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Date Scones

Tender scones filled with sweet pieces of dates–perfect with a cup of tea or coffee. A simple, tasty bake that will make everyone happy.
Course Breakfast, Snack
Cuisine American, British
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 8
Calories 239kcal
Author Jani H. Leuschel

Equipment

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup 2% milk, use your favorite non-dairy or dairy milk. Use another Tablespoon to brush the tops of unbaked scones.
  • 1 teaspoon white vinegar, sub lemon juice, if desired
  • 1 cup whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 1 cup white wheat (AP) flour
  • Tablespoons sugar
  • teaspoons baking powder
  • ¾ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 cup chopped, pitted dates
  • 4 Tablespoons butter, frozen
  • cinnamon sugar, for sprinkling on top of unbaked scones

Instructions

  • Wash hands thoroughly before beginning the recipe.
  • Add vinegar (or lemon juice) to milk and place in the refrigerator.
  • In a large bowl, combine flours, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, and salt. Whisk thoroughly.
  • Take sour milk out of the refrigerator and beat in the egg and vanilla with a fork or a whisk. Add chopped dates and mix until the date pieces are no longer sticking together.
    Return the wet ingredients in the refrigerator until needed.
  • Grate the frozen butter into the dry ingredients with a large-holed grating sheet set over the bowl or a box grater set on parchment paper.
  • With a pastry cutter, combine butter and dry ingredients, cutting in the fat until it is coated. The mixture should look like tiny pebbles
  • Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients, and add the wet ingredients. Mix all together to make a soft, ragged dough.
  • Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and knead up to 10 times, folding the dough in on itself until it holds together and is slightly smoother.
    Be careful not to knead too much! Overkneading will cause the scones to turn into rocks!
  • Shape the dough into a circle that is 1½ inches thick. Slice into 8 wedges.
    Brush wedges with milk and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar.
  • Transfer to a parchment-lined baking sheet. Place in the oven and check for doneness after 12 minutes. If scones are still too doughy, bake two to three more minutes.
    Scones should be lightly golden on top and have a crisp exterior.
  • Remove from oven and let cool for five minutes. Transfer scones to a wire rack, and cool for up to 20 minutes before serving.
  • Serve with tea, coffee, or milk. Pass preserves, jam, butter, and/or clotted cream.

Notes

If you want to reduce the total amount of saturated fat without losing the buttery flavor, here are two options:
  • Sub two Tablespoons butter-flavored shortening for half the butter. Since the FDA banned trans fats a few years ago, reformulated shortening has less saturated fat than butter. 
 
Freeze the shortening and grate it into the dry ingredients, just as you would the butter. This puts the saturated fat count between 2 and 3 grams per scone.
 
  • Make your scones smaller. You can cut your scone dough to serve 12 instead of eight. Each smaller scone will have three instead of four grams of saturated fat.
You can also use skim milk, but the flavor and texture will suffer. 😑

Nutrition

Calories: 239kcal | Carbohydrates: 40g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 7g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 2g | Trans Fat: 0.3g | Cholesterol: 37mg | Sodium: 216mg | Potassium: 241mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 16g | Vitamin A: 256IU | Vitamin C: 0.1mg | Calcium: 97mg | Iron: 2mg

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Poached salmon fillets with dill and lemon 🐟 https://jani-foodhall.org/poached-salmon-fillets-with-dill-and-lemon/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=poached-salmon-fillets-with-dill-and-lemon https://jani-foodhall.org/poached-salmon-fillets-with-dill-and-lemon/#comments Thu, 25 Aug 2022 22:55:00 +0000 https://jani-foodhall.org/?p=1211 Poached salmon is fast and fuss-free. It’s such an uber-healthy prep! A heap of fresh dill on atop the fish and lemon wedges on the side amp up the deliciousness. This elegant but easy entrée is full of anti-inflammatory fats and protein. Calling all pescatarians! Ingredients and Equipment 5- to 6-ounce salmon fillets Water Vermouth...

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Poached salmon is fast and fuss-free. It’s such an uber-healthy prep! A heap of fresh dill on atop the fish and lemon wedges on the side amp up the deliciousness.

This elegant but easy entrée is full of anti-inflammatory fats and protein. Calling all pescatarians!

As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission from purchases made through links on this blog at no extra cost to you. Thank you!

Teal and brown pottery plate with pink salmon fillet topped with dill, green snap peas, lemon wedge, and dab of fluffy rice
Poached salmon fillet topped with dill and served with lemon, sugar snap peas, and brown rice.
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Ingredients and Equipment

Salmon fillets, lemon wedges, fresh dill, seasonings, and white wine on pale marble countertop
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel
  • 5- to 6-ounce salmon fillets
  • Water
  • Vermouth or white wine (optional)
  • Kosher salt
  • Black peppercorns
  • Fresh dill
  • Lemon wedges
  • Heavy, deep skillet

You could also use a whole fillet weighing up to a pound and a half.

How to Poach

  • In a heavy, deep skillet, add water to a depth of at least three inches. Add a splash of white wine or vermouth, if desired. You need enough liquid to almost cover the fillets.
  • Season the water with salt, peppercorns, and half a large bay leaf.
Pouring salt and peppercorns into water-filled skillet containing a bay leaf
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel
  • Bring the water to a boil. This helps to release flavor from the seasonings. Slide in the fillets.
  • Top with fresh dill. Return the water to a boil and then turn the heat to low and cover the pan.
  • Check the center of the fish after six minutes. Salmon is cooked at 140 to145 F. This may take up to 10 minutes. The fish should be flaky with a moist pink, not red, center.

Use an instant-read thermometer to quickly check for doneness.

  • Remove fillets and let drain on paper towels.

Do not leave the fish in the poaching liquid for a long time because this toughens the flesh. You want flaky, not rubbery fish fillets! 😝

Cooking tip: Skinned fillets are easier and slightly faster to poach than skin-on. Removing the skin will also create less fishy odor in your kitchen!

Why choose poaching for fish?

It’s easy, quick, healthy, and cleanup is a breeze!

  • Fish is a light menu choice–terrific if the weather is hot! Poached fish only needs 5 to 10 minutes on the stovetop. No fancy equipment is required.
  • Depending on how much fish your crew will eat, all you’ll need is a deep frying pan with a lid. (To poach a large amount, you can use a high-sided roasting pan.)

Unfortunately, fish can be delicate, falling apart easily. To keep it in one piece, many chefs and cookbook authors recommend poaching a large piece of fish, i.e., the entire side of a large fish or smaller whole fish.

I have had success, however, with the individual portions of thicker fillets, which are a better size when you’re only feeding one to four people.

Why choose salmon?

Since everyone in my house likes salmon, it’s the first choice for fish. We sometimes have it twice a week, per current health recommendations.

If you’re following the Mediterranean Diet, fish can be eaten often, unlike red meat, which should be consumed infrequently.

raw salmon fillet
Credit: congerdesign on Pixabay

Salmon is touted for its omega-3 fats, particularly EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), long-chain fatty acids that are anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective.

Populations that regularly eat fish, such as the Inuits and Japanese, have fewer heart attacks and problems with fatty plaques lining their blood vessels. 

Eating fish may be more protective than taking fish oil supplements. 

Studies attribute many other well-body effects to DHA, including benefits for the nervous system, vision, and memory. Fish oils may contribute to successful aging.

Nutrition bonuses of salmon

  • More than 20 grams of protein
  • About 13 grams of fat 
  • Niacin (vitamin B3), more than half the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA)  
  • Vitamin B6, more than a third of the RDA 
  • Vitamin B12, almost 1.5X the RDA 
  • Choline, excellent source (20% or more) 
  • Vitamin D, one of the few foods that contain vitamin D! 
  • Appropriate for pregnant women due to high levels of EPA and DHA (beneficial for infant health) and low levels of mercury

Nutrition information for a 3.5-ounce serving from FoodData Central, from the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service.

How to store

Poaching is perfect for make-ahead meals.

  • Refrigerator: Store the salmon in a container or zip-top plastic bag for up to four days although it will taste best when eaten within two days.
  • Freezer: Store it tightly wrapped for up to three months. Thaw in the refrigerator or submerge the freezer container in cold water. Use thawed fish in casseroles or add it to pasta dishes.

How to serve

  • As an entree with a cooked grain or pilaf and a green vegetable
  • As a salad topper
  • In a salmon bowl with chunks of avocado, cooked sweet or white potatoes, or noodles, and shaved onion
  • As salmon patties. Flake fish into a bowl and combine with bread crumbs, pickle relish, mayo or Greek yogurt, dried thyme, and a raw egg. Fry or bake the patties.

Poached salmon tastes best with a sauce, such as my Savory Greek Yogurt Sauce, bright with lemon and garlic.

Classic sauces to serve alongside are aioli (garlic mayonnaise) or a green sauce of herbs.

Asparagus Grilled in Foil or marinated zucchini salad are fresh side dishes!

Cooked pink salmon filets topped with dill draining on white paper towels with a round white dish of yellow lemon wedges
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Poached Salmon Fillets with Dill and Lemon

Poaching is an easy, healthy way to cook salmon or other meaty fish fillets. Top with dill and serve with lemon wedges to amp the flavor.
Course Entrees, Main Course
Cuisine Any
Diet Diabetic, Gluten Free, Low Calorie
Keyword anti-inflammatory, B vitamins, cardioprotective, healthy fats
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 6 minutes
Servings 2 generous servings
Calories 242kcal
Author Jani H. Leuschel

Ingredients

  • 12 ounces salmon, about 2 fillets, without skin
  • Splash of white wine or vermouth, optional
  • ½ bay leaf
  • ½ teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 5 peppercorns, use more if you like pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh dill
  • lemon wedges

Instructions

  • Wash hands thoroughly before beginning the recipe.
  • Fill a deep, high-sided skillet with about three inches of water. Splash in some white wine or vermouth, if desired. Add the bay leaf, salt, and a few peppercorns, and bring to a boil over high heat.
  • Add the salmon fillets and turn the heat to low. Top the fillets with fresh dill. Cover the pan and allow to simmer for about six minutes.
  • Remove the lid and carefully test for doneness with an instant-read thermometer or a fork. Leave them for another two to three minutes if the interior appears raw and red or they have not reached 140 to 145 F.
  • When cooked, remove fillets to a bed of paper towels to drain. They should have moist, pink centers and flake easily.
  • Serve with lemon wedges.

Notes

Poached fish is a classic for summer meals when the heat makes cool food more appetizing. The fillets can be served simply with lemon wedges, good-quality mayonnaise, or another sauce. (Read the post!)
Beware of leaving the fish in the poaching liquid for too long!  It will toughen up.
Poached salmon can stand in for tuna in a Salad Nicoise, or combine it with a bowlful of romaine lettuce. Add Parmesan cheese and croutons and — Boom! — Salmon Caesar for dinner or lunch. 🥗
 
 

Nutrition

Serving: 6ounces | Calories: 242kcal | Carbohydrates: 0.2g | Protein: 34g | Fat: 11g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 4g | Monounsaturated Fat: 4g | Cholesterol: 94mg | Sodium: 657mg | Potassium: 840mg | Fiber: 0.1g | Vitamin A: 102IU | Vitamin C: 0.4mg | Calcium: 23mg | Iron: 1mg

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Grilled Asparagus in Foil https://jani-foodhall.org/grilled-asparagus-in-foil/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=grilled-asparagus-in-foil Tue, 05 Jul 2022 18:23:49 +0000 https://jani-foodhall.org/?p=4437 Grilled Asparagus in Foil might be the perfect grill season side dish. Ready to eat in 20 minutes, five ingredients, almost no clean-up–what more could you want? A great make-ahead side that’s delicious and healthy? You got it! Ingredients 1 pound bunch of asparagus Olive oil Kosher salt Coarse ground black pepper Lemon juice from...

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Grilled Asparagus in Foil might be the perfect grill season side dish. Ready to eat in 20 minutes, five ingredients, almost no clean-up–what more could you want?

A great make-ahead side that’s delicious and healthy? You got it!

As an Amazon affiliate, I earn a small commission from purchases made through links on this blog at no extra cost to you. Thank you!

Grilled asparagus on foil with a whole lemon and half lemon and seasonings
Grilled Asparagus in Foil Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Ingredients

  • 1 pound bunch of asparagus
  • Olive oil
  • Kosher salt
  • Coarse ground black pepper
  • Lemon juice from a half a lemon
  • Seasoning of choice: optional
Ingredients needed for asparagus recipe including lemon halves, salt, pepper, oil, and asparagus on blue background with pink labels
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel
  • Asparagus: Any type of asparagus works in this recipe as long as it’s fresh, not canned or frozen. Thick or thin, white or green, whatever kind you find in the store, farmer’s market, or garden will be fine. 

Often, green asparagus, which is easy to source, has purplish tips. This is normal and a sign of quality produce.

  • Olive oil: Grilled asparagus will taste nice with extra-virgin olive oil. If butter is your go-to choice of fat, try replacing half of the olive oil with butter. You’ll enjoy the flavor as well as some of the healthy monounsaturated fats in olive oil.

Another healthy fat to consider for this recipe is avocado oil.

  • Lemon and seasoning: You probably won’t need more than half a lemon for this recipe. Along with the fresh citrus squeeze, salt, and pepper, you could amp the spears with your favorite seasonings.


Popular flavor choices are grated Parmesan cheese, Italian seasoning, lemon pepper, red pepper flakes, and fresh chopped dill or flat-leaf parsley. 

You could also experiment with pre-made blends like Everything Bagel, Green Goddess, Cajun seasoning, or Herbes de Provence. 

How to prep

Before you begin prepping, wash your hands thoroughly.

  • Wash and dry: Rinse the asparagus under running water. Hold the spears with the tips down and gently use your fingers to remove any dirt from the stalks and tips.

Dry them using an absorbent kitchen towel or paper towels.

  • Trim: Remove the undigestible woody ends from the stalks by snapping or trimming. Some prefer snapping off the ends because the asparagus seems to break at just the right spot.
Asparagus lined up on a white cutting board with chef's knife cutting off the bottoms; on a mottled blue countertop
Line up the clean asparagus and lop off the ends before grilling. Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

🔪 Applying a knife to trim the spears gives a neater appearance and is quicker if you line up the bottoms of several stalks.

  • Make the foil packets: Tear off a large rectangular piece of extra-wide foil and place it on the counter shiny side up. Line up half of your clean and trimmed asparagus stalks.

Drizzle stalks with a Tablespoon of olive oil, salt, pepper, and any dried seasoning. Using tongs or your hands, coat the asparagus with the oil and flavor elements.

Fold the long sides of the foil in over the spears and then the short ends, making a packet for the grill or oven. You can make these early in the day or the night before if you want.

With a one-pound bunch asparagus, make two packets, so that it’s not necessary to stack them on top of each other. They will grill fast and evenly in a single layer.

Fingertips touching square foil packet on mottled blue countertop
The foil packet of asparagus may end up square or rectangular. Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

How to grill

Preheat the gas grill. After cleaning, place the foil packets on it perpendicular to the grates. If your grill has a temperature gauge, it should register between 350 and 450 F.

  • Time on the grill: To avoid overcooking and ending up with mushy asparagus, it’s best to aim for slightly undercooking. They will continue to steam in the packets after you take them off the grill. 

The amount of time needed depends on the thickness of your asparagus. Skinny, pencil stalks cook faster than fat stalks. Thin spears may be ready as soon as seven minutes. Fat stalks could take up to 20 minutes on a 350 F grill.

Square foil packets on grill grates
Thin asparagus grilled in foil packets may be ready to serve in less than 10 minutes. Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

In general, grill pencil asparagus for seven to eight minutes, turning the packet halfway through. Thicker spears will need an average of 12 to 14 minutes, again turning the packet halfway through.

  • Benefits of grilling in foil: The packets help seal in the flavor and keep the spears from drying out because you steam and grill at the same time. Also, they keep slim stalks from falling through the grates!

When the asparagus has finished grilling, open the packets and squeeze lemon juice over the spears. Close the packet to keep them warm until ready to serve.

Be sure and pour those tasty, lemony juices over the spears before eating!

Seasonings:

In addition to amping the flavor, dried herbs and spices have health benefits. They are a concentrated source of antioxidants and polyphenols. To learn more about them, read Mediterranean Spices and Herbs for Better Health.

My posts on garlic and how to make a bold Chermoula Spice Blend explain how dried and fresh spices do a body good.  

  • Lower sodium hack: Use a hot spice like red pepper flakes or Cajun seasoning if you’re adding less salt. Spicy heat helps keep your tongue from tasting low or no salt in a dish. Hot spice also benefits metabolism and digestion!

FAQs

  • Should I snap off the woody end or trim the asparagus to get rid of it?

Asparagus will often bend and break right where the woody end of the stalk meets the tender part. For a neater appearance, however, line the bottoms up on a cutting board and chop them off, several stalks at a time.

Chopping can be faster and result in less waste than breaking off the ends.

  • How can I tell when the asparagus is done?

Look for a bright green spear that has softened slightly so the interior is tender and the exterior is firm to the bite (sort of like al dente pasta). 

Thin spears often go slightly limp, and that’s okay. You just don’t want them to turn mushy.

  • Can I prep the packets ahead of time?

Yes! This is a perfect make-ahead recipe.

You can make the packets with any seasonings you like early in the day or the night before. However, it’s best to add lemon juice at the last minute so the asparagus don’t lose their bright green color.

  • When are asparagus available?

The season for asparagus runs from February to June, peaking in April. But, many grocery stores sell asparagus year-round.

  • Can you cook asparagus in foil in the oven or on the stovetop?

To use the oven for this recipe, prepare the foil packets and place them in a preheated 400 F oven. They may take slightly longer to cook.

If you want to use a stovetop grill pan, there is no need to make foil packets. Simply oil and season the asparagus and place them on a hot pan. Cover with a sheet of foil while grilling so the juices don’t evaporate.

Nutrition Bonuses

Asparagus is a tasty green vegetable with a high health quotient!  An excellent source of folate and vitamin K,  asparagus are also high in iron! 💪🏽

Here are the nutritional highlights for a four-ounce serving:

Fiber – 2.5 g

Folate – 55 mcg

Iron – 2.5 mg per serving

Potassium – 205 mg

Vitamins galore – C, B1, K, B6

Vitamin A – 750 IU

  • 715 mcg  lutein – zeaxanthin*
  • 450 mcg beta carotene*

Vitamin K – 42 mcg

Nutrition information from USDA.

*Lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta carotene are precursors to vitamin A that may benefit eye health.

Leftovers

Unfortunately, freezing is not a good option. The texture goes very soft. Frozen leftovers, however, could be of service in pureed soups. Use within three months of freezing. 

Store in refrigerator for two to three days and throw them into salads or add them to grain bowls. Pair with a dab of soft goat cheese. Chop and stir into risotto near the end of cooking.

Recipes to accompany grilled asparagus in foil

Umami-ish Grilled Boneless Chicken Thighs

Mustard Herb Instant Pot Pork Loin Roast

Any fish, chicken, or lamb rubbed with Chermoula Spice Blend would be perfect to enjoy with the asparagus!

Grilled asparagus on foil with a whole lemon and half lemon and seasonings
Print

Grilled Asparagus in Foil

Quick, easy vegetable side for your favorite grilled entree. Healthy and delicious, asparagus load your plate with flavor and nutrition!
Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Diet Diabetic, Gluten Free, Low Calorie, Low Lactose, Vegan, Vegetarian
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 96kcal
Author Jani H. Leuschel

Ingredients

Optional seasonings: Choose your favorite(s)

Instructions

  • Wash hands for 20 seconds before starting to cook.
  • Rinse asparagus under running water with tips facing down. Gently use your hands to remove any soil clinging to the tips or stalks.
    Dry the spears using a kitchen towel or paper towel.
  • Cut or snap off the tough ends of the stalks. If desired, you can do this in two or three batches by placing an even row of spears on a cutting board and chopping off the bottoms.
  • Line half the trimmed spears up on the shiny side of a large rectangle of extra-wide foil. Drizzle with a Tablespoon of olive oil. Season with ¼ teaspoon each of salt and black pepper.
    Optional: To each packet, add any of your favorite dry spices, such as ¼ teaspoon garlic or onion powder/granules, ¼ teaspoon oregano or Italian seasoning, or ⅛ teaspoon of crushed red pepper flakes.
    👀See list above.
    Note: This is not the time to add fresh herbs. Wait until after grilling.
  • Using tongs or your fingers, evenly coat the asparagus in the olive oil and seasonings.
    Fold the long sides of the foil over the line of spears and then seal the packet by folding in and crimping the short ends.
  • Repeat the process with the remaining half pound of asparagus spears.
  • Place the envelope on preheated gas grill perpendicular to the grates. Cook for a total of 7 to 8 minutes for thin, pencil asparagus and 9 to 12 minutes for fat asparagus, turning halfway though the cooking time.
    It's okay to open a packet after the minimum cooking time and check for doneness. Thin asparagus can go from slightly limp to mushy very quickly.
  • When grilling time is finished, open the packets and squeeze the juice from a quarter of a lemon over each packet of spears. Add any fresh herbs and toss.
    Close the packets to seal in the flavors and keep the asparagus warm until ready to serve.
  • Pour the lemony, seasoned juices over, and eat them hot with grilled fish, portobello mushrooms, flank steak, or boneless chicken thighs or breasts.

Video

Notes

🌡 Grill temperatures can be highly variable. In general, temperatures for the asparagus should be between 350 and 450 F. Don’t worry if your grill doesn’t have a temperature gauge, the packets of asparagus will still be okay. Just be sure and check them after the minimum cooking times.
Thickness of the asparagus will dictate how long to grill. Thin spears need only seven to eight minutes total, while thick spears could take up to 12 or 14 minutes. 
Keep in mind that after you remove them from the hot grill, they will continue to steam in the packets. If you don’t eat them soon, they may become mushy!

Nutrition

Calories: 96kcal | Carbohydrates: 8g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 7g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 5g | Sodium: 151mg | Potassium: 283mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 3g | Vitamin A: 914IU | Vitamin C: 21mg | Calcium: 41mg | Iron: 3mg

Copyright © 2022 Jani H. Leuschel

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Roasted Tomato Chutney: A kickin’ condiment https://jani-foodhall.org/roasted-tomato-chutney/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=roasted-tomato-chutney https://jani-foodhall.org/roasted-tomato-chutney/#comments Wed, 15 Jun 2022 14:04:00 +0000 https://jani-foodhall.org/?p=4308 With summer’s crop of tomatoes starting to ripen, here’s a recipe to keep company with gazpacho and salsa: Roasted Tomato Chutney. This cooked chutney is full of jammy, melty tomatoes. Thick and chunky, sweet and spicy–this condiment makes you understand how a tomato can be a fruit. It makes a flavorful sidekick for a wide...

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With summer’s crop of tomatoes starting to ripen, here’s a recipe to keep company with gazpacho and salsa: Roasted Tomato Chutney.

This cooked chutney is full of jammy, melty tomatoes. Thick and chunky, sweet and spicy–this condiment makes you understand how a tomato can be a fruit.

It makes a flavorful sidekick for a wide variety of dishes and cleanup is a breeze!

As an Amazon affiliate, I earn when you buy from links supplied in this blog at no extra cost to you.

Ingredients

Large whole tomatoes, jalapeno, onion, peeled garlic, and seasonings wit labels on mottled blue-gray background
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel
  • Tomatoes
  • Jalapeno or green bell pepper
  • Onion
  • Garlic
  • Sugar
  • Cumin
  • Red pepper flake or coarse ground black pepper
  • Salt
  • Olive oil
  • Cilantro or Flat-leaf parsley

Tomatoes: You can use hot-house tomatoes from the store. If you’re lucky enough, however, to have ones from your garden, those are an even better choice. Chutney is a great use for an abundance of home-grown and/or overripe tomatoes.

Make a double batch and give some away as a gift or freeze. You could also make it shelf-stable by canning if you have time.

Onion: Use your favorite color, sliced instead of chopped. I prefer the sweeter taste of yellow onions.

Garlic: To get the most nutrition from your garlic, smash or rough chop and let it sit while you prep the other ingredients, so it develops allicins. These chemical compounds have many health benefits.

Remove the garlic sprout if it’s large and green so your chutney won’t be bitter.

Peppers: Use a mild green bell, jalapeno, or maybe another likely suspect from your garden. Bear in mind that jalapenos, serranos, and chipotles will give the chutney a salsa-ish character.

When combined with cumin, this is especially true.

How to make Roasted Tomato Chutney

  1. Preheat the oven and line a low-sided sheet pan with extra-wide foil. 
  2. Cut tomatoes into wedges using a serrated knife. (If using cherry tomatoes, no prep other than washing is required.)
  3. Place the tomatoes on a foil-lined pan and scatter chopped pepper, onion slices, and smashed garlic over the top.
  4. Sprinkle with sugar, kosher salt, and cumin.
  5. Pour olive oil over all the ingredients.
  6. Remove from the oven after roasting for 15 minutes. Smash the tomatoes and stir to mix with vegetables and spices. Return to oven and roast another 15 minutes.
  7. After removing the pan from the oven, let the chutney cool slightly. Then, stir in fresh chopped cilantro or flat-leaf parsley.
Yellow cutting board covered with tomato wedges with serrated knife nearby on mottled blue background
If using large tomatoes, cut them into wedges with a serrated knife. Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Do not allow the tomatoes, onions, or garlic to darken too much. Turn the heat down to 400 F if the vegetables start to burn.

Roasted smashed tomatoes, with green peppers, onion, and seasonings including a green sprinkle of cilantro; all on sheet pan.
At the end of the roasting time, let the chutney cool for a few minutes. Sprinkle with cilantro. Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Serve by lifting the edges of the foil and making a bowl with it. Pour chutney atop rice, pasta, grilled fish, or grilled chicken.

You can also pour it into a bowl to serve family-style alongside a meal.

FAQs

How long can I store this chutney in the refrigerator?

It will last up to a month or maybe longer in the refrigerator depending on the acidity of your tomatoes. As it sits, it does get slightly watery, so you may need to drain it.

Does this chutney recipe freeze well?

Yes. It will be fine in the freezer for six months to a year. Store it in a container with all the air removed. You can use a quart-size zip bag for convenience or any two-cup container.

The silicone Souper Cube or ice cube trays are other options for freezing. Once frozen, chutney cubes can be popped out and stored in quart or gallon freezer bags.

Is chutney an Indian condiment or sauce?

In India, chutneys are very diverse and served to complement every meal, from breakfast to dinner. 

In Western countries, they are often simmered creations of fruits and vegetables that are spicy and jammy. Major Grey’s mango chutney is a well-known and much-loved prototype.

Is there a difference between chutney, relish, and salsa?

It depends on who you ask! All three condiments are highly flavored.

Relishes often have a pickled element and more vinegar. Salsas are usually associated with Southwestern cuisine and feature spices like chile powders, cumin, cilantro, and lime juice.

White decorative ceramic bowl filled with chunky Roasted Tomato Chutney on mottled blue background
Bowl of Roasted Tomato Chutney Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Chutneys tend to have a broader spice palate, and some are a bit sweet, particularly if they are more Western. 

Mint is popular in Indian chutneys along with cumin, turmeric, garam masala, and many other herbs and spices! These healthy spices can add nutrition and flavor to your main dish.

To explore more chutneys, check out Bella Bean’s inexpensive cookbook, 200 Chutney Recipes: Not Just a Chutney Cookbook! 

Chutney comes from the Indian word chatni, which means “to lick.”

From the Urdu Language

Nutrition Bonuses of Roasted Tomato Chutney

Vitamins C and A: Tomatoes are rich in vitamin C and when cooked, they form the antioxidant lycopene, a beta-carotene form of vitamin A. Research on lycopene shows that it may have preventive benefits for cancers of the prostate, lungs, and stomach.

Low-fat, vegan, dairy- and gluten-free: Compared with many sauces, Roasted Tomato Chutney has less fat. It’s a much healthier option for topping eggs than a buttery Benedict or a creamy roux-based sauce.

In addition, it’s made entirely from plant-based ingredients. This chutney is an easy, tasty way to add a plant to your plate and get your Five a Day, which lowers the risk for chronic diseases–diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and others.

Immunity boosting: Onions, garlic, and peppers, the other vegetable ingredients in the chutney recipe, are known to enhance immunity.

Increases iron and calcium absorption and stimulates the creation of collagen: Vitamin C in tomatoes acts as a nutrition booster.

Eating the chutney with foods that contain iron, especially plant-based iron, helps you take up that iron. Also, enjoying a food rich in vitamin C can help offset the inhibitory effect of black tea on iron absorption from plant-based foods.

In addition, it boosts calcium absorption and prompts your body to make collagen, a boon for your bones, joints, nails, and skin.

What to pair with the chutney?

Roasted Tomato Chutney is copacetic with a huge number of foods. It plays well with summer fish grills, such as halibut or mahi-mahi, and adds spark to a simply prepared chicken breast. 

It jazzes up pasta or rice and is a delight with egg dishes like strata, frittata, and scrambles.

Want more?

Here’s another quick vitamin C-rich recipe, Broccoli Cheddar Potato Bake. Plus, this post contains extra useful info on how vitamin C may improve your health.

If you’re looking for foods that boost your immunity, check out my article on quercetin. It features a healthy salad, Colorful Leaves with Citrus.

Pretty white ceramic bowl filled with chunky Roasted Tomato Chutney with chopped herbs sprinkled around it on a mottled blue background
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Roasted Tomato Chutney

Chunky, melty tomatoes to spoon on top of pasta, white fish, or chicken breasts.
Course Condiment, Side Dish
Cuisine American, Healthy, Indian
Keyword inexpensive, vitamin C
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 6
Calories 92kcal
Author Jani H. Leuschel

Ingredients

  • 4 large tomatoes, each cut into 6 to 8 wedges, depending on size, or a pint of cherry tomatoes
  • ½ large onion, sliced
  • 1 jalapeno, medium, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, roughly chopped or smashed
  • ¾ teaspoon cumin
  • ½ teaspoon sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt, kosher
  • ½ teaspoon pepper, or ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes for a warmer taste
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil, extra virgin, roughly. Use more or less as desired.
  • 2 Tablespoons cilantro, chopped or use flat-leaf parsley

Instructions

  • Wash hands for 20 seconds before starting.
  • Heat oven to 425 F. Line a sheet pan with extra-wide heavy-duty foil.
  • Using a large serrated knife, cut tomatoes in half after washing. Remove the core and place the flat side down on the cutting board. Cut each half into three or four wedges, depending on the size. Arrange them on the sheet pan.
  • Scatter the chopped jalapeno, onion slices, and garlic pieces over the tomatoes.
  • Sprinkle with cumin, salt, and red pepper flakes (or black pepper if you want a milder spice). Drizzle olive oil over all the ingredients on the sheet pan.
  • Roast in the oven. After 15 minutes, remove the pan and press on the tomatoes to smash. Stir to mix the pulpy tomatoes with vegetables and spices.
    Return to oven and roast another 15 minutes.
  • Remove from oven and let cool for a few minutes.
    Sprinkle with the chopped cilantro.
  • To serve, lift the edges of the foil and make a bowl with the foil liner. Pour directly onto food, or pour the chutney into a bowl and serve family-style with a meal.

Notes

🌶 With the jalapeno and cumin, this chutney becomes very salsa-ish. If you prefer a less south-of-the-border flavor, use fresh flat-leaf parsley instead of cilantro to finish the chutney.
This recipe freezes well for at least three months. If you are lucky enough to have overflowing tomato plants, you could also use canning techniques to make the chutney shelf-stable. 
If canning, it’s a good idea to add a tablespoon of balsamic or red-wine vinegar to the recipe. To offset the additional acid, increase the sugar from ½ to a full teaspoon.
For the fresh sauce, no additional acid is needed since tomatoes usually have a good amount of acid. 
 

Nutrition

Calories: 92kcal | Carbohydrates: 11g | Protein: 2.3g | Fat: 5.2g | Saturated Fat: 0.7g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.7g | Monounsaturated Fat: 3.5g | Sodium: 206.5mg | Potassium: 571.5mg | Fiber: 3.1g | Sugar: 6.8g | Vitamin A: 1922.2IU | Vitamin C: 35.2mg | Calcium: 32mg | Iron: 0.9mg

Copyright © 2022 Jani H. Leuschel

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Vitamin C-rich foods: Recipe for healthy college students https://jani-foodhall.org/healthy-snacks-for-college-students/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=healthy-snacks-for-college-students https://jani-foodhall.org/healthy-snacks-for-college-students/#comments Sat, 04 Jun 2022 15:00:31 +0000 https://jani-foodhall.org/?p=394 Feeling tired and catching a cold are two of the most common health complaints of college life. Studying does require extra energy, especially when added to work demands, and viruses, the kind that infects humans (not computers) tend to invade campuses. However, a regular dose of vitamin C can treat fatigue and colds.

The post Vitamin C-rich foods: Recipe for healthy college students appeared first on Food Hall by Jani.

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Feeling tired and catching a cold are two of the most common health complaints of college life. Getting enough vitamin C, by eating healthy snacks rich in vitamin C can help.

Studying does require extra energy, especially when added to work demands. Plus, viruses, the kind that infects humans (not computers) tend to invade campuses.

As an Amazon affiliate, I earn when you buy from links supplied in this blog at no extra cost to you.

Vitamin C synergy

Vitamin C helps the body use the iron from plant foods (non-heme iron), and–equally important for fighting fatigue–it’s necessary for the production of a compound called carnitine.

When your body runs out of carbohydrates, carnitine lets you use fatty acids for energy. (Although some people take carnitine supplements to burn fat, evidence supporting the use of these supplements is weak.)

Napping person in track pants laying on the ground with a book over face in a space with green grass and green trees
Credit: Tony Tran on Unsplash

Vitamin C and immunity

When it comes to defending against viruses, vitamin C boosts the immune system and is especially helpful when you are under stress–and aren’t college students usually highly stressed!

It doesn’t, however, keep you from catching a cold unless you take it as a daily preventive, before exposure.

It will not put the kibosh on a cold when taken after getting sick although some evidence shows that it shortens a cold’s length and severity. Perhaps this is because it destroys histamine–the cause of watery eyes and runny noses.

Mood and beauty

Vitamin C may make you happier and better-looking.

It prompts collagen production, which creates strong connective tissue, heals wounds, and nourishes your skin.

Asian face with water droplets around

Because it performs antioxidant actions, scavenging free radicals, some research touts it as anti-aging. Free radicals are damaged compounds created by reactions in our cells that are a cause of aging.

Credit: Sunny Ng on Unsplash

Because it performs antioxidant actions, scavenging free radicals, some research touts it as anti-aging. Free radicals are damaged compounds created by reactions in our cells that are a cause of aging.

It enhances mood by helping produce the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. Dopamine is the “joy” chemical in our brain. Serotonin regulates mood, appetite, memory, desire, and the body’s internal clock or circadian rhythms.

More health benefits

Other benefits of this happy vitamin are that it can lower blood pressure and risk factors for heart disease.

How much vitamin C?

The DRI (Daily Reference Intake) for adults is 75 mg for women and 90 mg for men. An orange has about 60 mg of vitamin C while a baked potato, including the skin, has 20 mg. (A small serving of McDonald’s French fries contains 12 mg.)

Most supplements have a minimum of 250 mg, which is more than the DRI. The Upper Limit is 2,000 mg although higher amounts may be okay when intake is gradually increased.

Symptoms of vitamin C overload include nausea and diarrhea. (Kidney stones are another suspected side effect of too much vitamin C!)

A lower percentage of vitamin C is absorbed when you take mega doses (usually as a supplement since it is difficult to eat 30 oranges in one sitting). Absorption is also less in cigarette smokers, whose daily needs for the vitamin are increased by 35 mg.

Physical signs you’re not getting enough vitamin C

If you’re low in vitamin C, you might notice what appears to be a rash, small reddish spots caused by the breakage of capillaries. Another sign is easy bruising and curly/corkscrew hairs on your arms, face, and other body surfaces.

A study of college students and vitamin C performed some years ago showed that many do not get enough because they don’t eat many fruits and veggies.

Oranges and clementines are juicy, healthy snacks for college students. Sweet strips of colored bell peppers are another healthy snacking option with loads of vitamin C.

Here is a sampling of high vitamin C fruits and veggies.

Kiwi fruit, 1 medium75 mg
🌶 Red chili pepper (1) 65 mg
Yellow sweet pepper (½ cup)137 mg
Kale, 1 c raw80 mg
🍓 Strawberries, 1 c 89 mg

Reduced cancer risk is yet another reason to load up on vitamin C-rich fruits and veggies. Vitamin C has been linked with fewer cancers of the mouth, esophagus, and pharynx, according to studies and reviews of literature.

Summary

Seeking out vitamin C daily in foods or low-dose supplements (ascorbic acid) will improve the function of many systems within your body.

Making vitamin C-rich foods and beverages could pay dividends in increased energy and improved mood and skin. It may even help you avoid diseases from the common cold to cancer.

Note: Nutrition takes time to work its magic. Just as one day of weight lifting won’t result in a bodybuilder’s physique, a single day of good nutrition will not immediately cure disease.

Consistent healthy eating, however, leads to better well-being.

Eating healthy food fills your body with energy and nutrients. Imagine your cells smiling back at you and saying: “Thank you!”  

Karen Salmansohn

Here’s a fast microwave recipe featuring russet potatoes that has plenty of vitamin C. It’s actually full of all kinds of nutrition, including iron and calcium, which are best absorbed from plant foods when paired with vitamin C!

Baked potato with mashed broccoli filling, topped with melted Cheddar with fork, salt and pepper in the background
Print

Broccoli Cheese Potato Bake

A fast, easy small meal or healthy snack for college students or anyone who wants a quick and tasty bite. Potatoes and broccoli are excellent sources of vitamin C.
Course Dinner, lunch, Snack
Cuisine American
Diet Diabetic, Gluten Free, Vegetarian
Keyword gluten-free
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 2
Calories 338.7kcal
Author Jani H. Leuschel

Equipment

  • 1 small bowl or microwavable container
  • 1 fork
  • 1 mashing tool, such as a potato masher (optional)
  • 1 large spoon or spatula
  • 1 microwaveable plate, large

Ingredients

  • 4 ounces frozen broccoli florets, ¼ of a 16-ounce package
  • 2 russet potatoes, medium
  • ½ cup sharp Cheddar cheese, shredded
  • 2 teaspoons butter
  • olive oil, for rubbing the potato skins
  • salt and pepper, as desired for flavor

Instructions

  • Wash hands thoroughly for 20 seconds.
  • Place broccoli florets in a small, microwave-safe bowl. Cook on high power for about 3 minutes with a couple of tablespoons of water, until soft. Drain.
  • Wash potatoes and pierce each in several places with a fork. Rub with olive oil.
  • On a microwave-safe plate, cook potatoes on high power for 12 to 14 minutes, flipping halfway through cooking.
    At the end of the cook time, potatoes should feel very tender. If not, continue to microwave (high power) in intervals of 1 minute and 30 seconds. When done, let the potatoes rest briefly.
  • While potatoes are cooking, cut the butter into four pieces and scatter over the cooked broccoli. Season with a pinch of salt and mash until you get a slightly chunky consistency.
  • When potatoes have finished cooking, split them open in the center and score the inside. Loosen the insides with a fork. Mix half the mashed, buttered broccoli into the flesh of each potato.
  • Top with cheese and microwave at high power briefly, up to two minutes, to melt the cheese on both potatoes.
    If melting cheese on only one potato, microwave for 45 seconds to a minute.
  • Let them sit for a minute or two and then devour. Have salt, pepper, and any of your favorite seasonings (like Everything Bagel) ready on the side.

Notes

These potatoes offer ample nutrition: vitamin C, vitamin A, calcium, iron, potassium (eat the skin) and a nice serving of protein. But, they also have a good size serving of saturated fat.
So, if you are watching saturated fat intake for heart-health reasons, keep this in mind. You can lower the amount of saturated fat slightly, by using olive oil in place of butter when mashing the broccoli florets. 🥦🥦🥦
If you are counting servings of carbohydrates, each potato clocks in at three servings.

Nutrition

Serving: 1potato | Calories: 338.7kcal | Carbohydrates: 43g | Protein: 12.8g | Fat: 14g | Saturated Fat: 8.1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.6g | Monounsaturated Fat: 3.2g | Trans Fat: 0.2g | Cholesterol: 39mg | Sodium: 246.3mg | Potassium: 1090.3mg | Fiber: 4.2g | Sugar: 2.4g | Vitamin A: 763.4IU | Vitamin C: 62.7mg | Calcium: 255.3mg | Iron: 2.3mg

Copyright © 2022 Jani Hall Leuschel

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Lemon Chicken Traybake: An oven dinner that’s a winner! https://jani-foodhall.org/lemon-chicken-traybake/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=lemon-chicken-traybake https://jani-foodhall.org/lemon-chicken-traybake/#comments Thu, 05 May 2022 23:36:04 +0000 https://jani-foodhall.org/?p=4246 Lemon Chicken Traybake is a weeknight win. It’s an easy prep, one-dish dinner with a lively citrus flavor.  It’s delicious and almost everyone can enjoy it.  Allergies–no problem. Diabetes–ditto. It’s free of gluten, dairy, soy, and corn.  It’s packed with protein and cooks quickly in the oven–ready to eat in 30 minutes or less! Ingredients...

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Lemon Chicken Traybake is a weeknight win. It’s an easy prep, one-dish dinner with a lively citrus flavor. 

It’s delicious and almost everyone can enjoy it.  Allergies–no problem. Diabetes–ditto. It’s free of gluten, dairy, soy, and corn. 

It’s packed with protein and cooks quickly in the oven–ready to eat in 30 minutes or less!

Southwestern pottery dinner plate with chicken thigh, potatoes and lemon, and green beans
Potatoes and lemon slices roast with boneless, skinless chicken thighs in the Lemon Chicken Traybake recipe. Add a green vegetable to complete the meal! Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Ingredients and equipment:

Ingredients necessary for Lemon Chicken Tray Bake weeknight oven dinner with labels on a blue background
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel
  • Olive oil
  • Lemon juice
  • Salt
  • Small, baby potatoes
  • Lemon slices
  • Garlic
  • Chicken thighs
  • Lemon zest (optional)
  • Onion powder
  • Rosemary
  • Red pepper flakes or black pepper

🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿🌿

  • Sheet pan,18” x 13”, with low sides, or casserole dish
  • Extra-wide foil
  • Citrus juicer
  • Zest grater
  • Measuring spoons
  • Whisk

The only ingredients that require prep work are the lemon, potatoes, and rosemary (if you use the fresh herb).

Small new potatoes of any color are fine in the Lemon Chicken Traybake. Fingerlings are good, too.

Garlic can be sliced or roughly chopped. To learn more about its amazing health benefits, read my blog on Garlic Goodness.

A low-sided half-sheet pan measuring 18”x13” works best for the traybake recipe. It also leaves extra space for tossing on a few veggies. But, a 9”x13’ casserole dish will also give you a good bake even if items are a little crowded.

Lining the sheet pan with extrawide foil simplifies cleanup. But it’s pricey and sometimes difficult to find, so no worries if you skip it. The foil does have a place in your pantry if you’re partial to grilling. It’s excellent for grilled asparagus! 

Don’t like to fuss with grating lemon skins for zest? Then, choose a dry citrus peel spice blend instead, or leave it out entirely.

Grater with yellow handle and bright yellow lever citrus juicer on a bee pattern kitchen towel
Tools for zesting and juicing lemons. Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Optional ingredients in the recipe are flavor boosters. Choose and use depending on how much time you can spend cooking.

As for juicing lemons, I like the ease of a citrus lever, but a reamer will give you more juice if it’s not worn out. (This comes from well-known cookbook author and food scientist J. Kenji Lopez-Alt.)

How to prepare the traybake

After washing your hands, heat the oven and line the tray with extra-wide foil, if using, or apply non-stick spray.

Chop the potatoes into small pieces and make the marinade.

Toss the potatoes with a little more than half of the marinade, setting aside enough to brush onto the chicken thighs later.

Start roasting potatoes in the hot oven.

Small yellow potato chunks spread on sheet pan lined with aluminum foil
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Then, chop the rosemary so it’s ready to sprinkle. This is a fairly quick bake!

Raw chicken thighs on sheet pan with potato chunks and lemon

Remove potatoes from the oven and add lemon and garlic. Nestle in the chicken thighs.

Brush the thighs with reserved marinade and top them with lemon zest, if using.

Raw chicken thighs on sheet pan with potato chunks and lemon and seasonings

Sprinkle all with salt, onion powder, rosemary, and red pepper flake or black pepper.

Return pan to oven and finish roasting. (See the recipe card below for complete instructions.)

Cooked chicken thighs with potato chunks and lemon on a sheet pan
The lemon slices caramelize when roasted. Credit: Jani H, Leuschel

Serve with a salad and/or fresh vegetables.

Nutrition bonuses ➕➕➕

People on many different eating plans can enjoy Lemon Chicken Traybake because it’s:

  • Allergy- and diabetes-friendly
  • Gluten- and dairy-free
  • Low calorie
  • Mediterranean diet-friendly
  • Low in fat, heart-healthy

Most of the fats in the traybake are mono- or polyunsaturated. 

Chicken thighs are not as uber-skinny as breasts, but that makes them juicier, and they’re still a low-calorie protein. Plus, they have more iron than chicken breasts.

Baby or new potatoes are usually roasted with their skin on. This enriches the dish with fiber and increases the potassium and magnesium, and it makes for quicker prep!

The rosemary boosts the flavor, and this Mediterranean herb from southern Spain is a well-known antimicrobial and antioxidant. Also, because herbs and spices are so flavorsome, you won’t need as much salt.

🍋 Lemons have less nutrition than you might think but are such a fresh taste! That tongue-tickling acid keeps you coming back for another bite.

Storage, reheating, and make-ahead 

Store leftovers in the fridge for up to three days. Before eating, reheat in a 350 F oven for 15 to 20 minutes until hot. 

Lemon Chicken Traybake is not a great recipe to make ahead.

That’s because before adding the chicken, it’s best to give the potatoes a head start in the oven so they get soft. The prep, however, is quick, especially if you skip the optional ingredients!

🥶 Freeze the cooked chicken and potatoes for up to 3 months.

Chicken and food safety

Cook chicken to an internal temperature of 165 F to prevent foodborne illness. Check the temperature in the thickest place with an instant-read thermometer to be certain it’s safe to eat.

Testing temperature of cooked chicken thigh with instant read thermometer
Testing the internal temperature with an instant-read thermometer. Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Be sure to take soap and water to any surfaces that touched raw chicken, such as knives, plates, cutting boards, countertops, and, of course, hands!

Many of you know that washing chicken is not safe. Get the deets on handling poultry safely with this printable tip sheet from the USDA.

When participants in a recent study washed chicken, they contaminated the salad prepared nearby. Researchers said the bacteria was transferred from their hands rather than from splashing water. 

Other recipes you might like…

If you love a bright lemon flavor, try the healthy Eye-catching Zucchini Salad recipe or a Lemon Mousse.

Chicken thighs are one of our favorites, and the marinade for Umami Chicken Thighs makes them irresistible!

Southwestern pottery dinner plate with chicken thigh, potatoes and lemon, and green beans
Print

Lemon Chicken Traybake

Easy and flavorful oven-baked chicken and potato dinner
Course Dinner, Entrees, Mains
Cuisine American, British, Italian
Keyword garlic
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 28 minutes
Total Time 48 minutes
Servings 3
Calories 418.8kcal
Author Jani H. Leuschel

Equipment

Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil, extra virgin
  • 2 Tablespoon lemon juice, fresh squeezed
  • ½ teaspoon salt, kosher, divided use
  • 1 pound waxy potatoes, cut into smallish pieces; any color baby potatoes or fingerlings
  • ½ lemon, thinly sliced
  • 3 cloves garlic, sliced or roughly chopped
  • 1 ¼ pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
  • ½ teaspoon lemon zest, optional
  • ¼ teaspoon onion powder
  • ¼ teaspoon red pepper flake, optional, can sub black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, or 1 teaspoon dried, crumbled

Instructions

  • Wash hands with soap and water for 20 seconds.
  • Preheat oven to 425 F.
  • Line a low-sided sheet pan with foil or coat with non-stick spray, or use a 9"x13" casserole dish.
  • In a small bowl or glass measuring cup, combine olive oil, lemon juice, and ¼ teaspoon of salt. Whisk to combine into a marinade.
  • Reserve a generous Tablespoon of the marinade. In a medium bowl, toss potato chunks with the remaining marinade.
  • Pour the saucy potato chunks onto the prepared pan and spread evenly. Place in oven and roast for about 8 to 10 minutes.
  • Add the lemon slices and garlic to the potatoes, and then make room to place the chicken thighs on the pan. (It's good if some lemon slices and garlic get lodged underneath the thighs!)
    Note: Now is the time to add extra veggies like asparagus or zucchini coins to the pan if you want.
    Brush or drizzle the remaining marinade onto the chicken thighs. Sprinkle the thighs with lemon zest, if using.
    Season the chicken and potatoes with remaining salt. Sprinkle with onion powder, red pepper flakes (or black pepper), and rosemary.
  • Return to oven and roast for 20 minutes, or until the chicken reaches 165 degrees in the thickest part. (Use an instant-read thermometer to be sure.)
  • Serve with a salad or vegetable side.

Notes

You’ll end up with softer potatoes if you start roasting them before adding the chicken thighs to the sheet pan.
Throw some zucchini or broccoli on when you add the chicken to the sheet pan and you’ll end up with a one-pan dinner!

You can cook everything at once, but you’ll need to lower the oven temperature to 400 F. Roast the whole shebang for 30 minutes.  Your potatoes may be firmer, but you just might like them better that way!
 

Nutrition

Calories: 418.8kcal | Carbohydrates: 27.9g | Protein: 38.3g | Fat: 17.2g | Saturated Fat: 3.2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2.8g | Monounsaturated Fat: 9.4g | Trans Fat: 0.1g | Cholesterol: 172.4mg | Sodium: 580.6mg | Potassium: 1191.3mg | Fiber: 3.4g | Sugar: 2.7g | Vitamin A: 128IU | Vitamin C: 28mg | Calcium: 46.9mg | Iron: 2.9mg

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Triple Chocolate Muffins: Happy food for all chocolate lovers! https://jani-foodhall.org/triple-chocolate-muffins/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=triple-chocolate-muffins Thu, 21 Apr 2022 01:07:06 +0000 https://jani-foodhall.org/?p=4155 With a deep, dark flavor and enticing aroma, Triple Chocolate Muffins are perfect for Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, or any day you crave chocolate. Their flavor is more intense than cake or brownies! These muffins are decadent and nutritious. (The terms are not opposites!)  Read below to get the skinny on how to make them...

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With a deep, dark flavor and enticing aroma, Triple Chocolate Muffins are perfect for Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, or any day you crave chocolate. Their flavor is more intense than cake or brownies!

These muffins are decadent and nutritious. (The terms are not opposites!) 

chocolate muffins topped with white chocolate drizzle on a baking rack on a blue countertop
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

Read below to get the skinny on how to make them plus the nutritional deets.

As an Amazon Associate, I earn a small commission at no cost to you when you make a purchase from links on this blog. Thank you!

Ingredients:

The many ingredients needed to make triple chocolate muffins with labels on a mottled blue background
Credit: Jani H. Leuschel
  • Whole-wheat pastry flour
  • All-purpose flour
  • Cocoa powder (natural, not Dutch-processed)
  • Stevia-blend sweetener
  • Espresso powder (optional, but adds depth to the flavor)
  • Baking soda
  • Salt
  • Bittersweet chocolate
  • Canola oil
  • Plain low-fat Greek yogurt (can sub plant-based yogurt if vegan)
  • Eggs (can sub flaxseed eggs if vegan)
  • Vanilla
  • Bittersweet (dark) chocolate chips

Flour: Anyone with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity can substitute a gluten-free flour for the whole-wheat and all-purpose flours.

I like using whole-wheat pastry flour when making cakes, cookies, and pastry because it is not as strong as regular whole-wheat flour. This means your baked goods get a touch of whole-grain goodness and achieve a higher rise.

Cocoa: For optimum nutrition and flavor, choose natural, not Dutch-processed cocoa powder. Dutch-process cocoa has alkali added, which changes how it reacts in recipes and reduces the nutrition slightly by removing some of the flavanols.

If you want to sub Dutch-process cocoa in the recipe below, add half a teaspoon baking powder and reduce the amount of baking soda to half a teaspoon.

The two brands of cocoa that I like are Scharffen Berger and Ghiradelli Premium Baking Unsweetened Cocoa Powder.

Sweetener: It’s easiest to use a stevia that measures just like sugar. For excellent nutrition, Sweet Complete from Truvia is a good choice because it blends stevia with erythritol and with prebiotic chicory root, which is good for your gut.

Of course, you can use sugar in place of stevia sweetener, which costs more! Having some sugar helps the bake and the taste. I don’t want anyone to take a bite and immediately know the muffins are lower in added sugars! 

Instant espresso powder: If you have it in your pantry, espresso powder heightens the dark chocolate flavor. But, you don’t have to make a special purchase. The muffins will taste yummy without it.

I use Medaglia D’Oro, available in many grocery stores, or you can order espresso powder if you’d like to try it. 

Red Guittard dark baking chip wrapper, chocolate muffin with white drizzle, Scharffen Berger cocoa tin on light wood grain surface

Bittersweet baking chocolate and chocolate chips: You can sub in semisweet, but the flavor is more intense with bittersweet. Plus, darker chocolate usually offers more nutrition, especially in the form of flavanols. 

  • Guittard has baking chocolate for melting down with 70% cacao, as well as extra dark chips with 63% cacao. The chips were a top pick by ConsumerLab.com!
  • Ghiradelli has a 60% bittersweet baking bar and a bittersweet chip. Both were rated highly by ConsumerLab.com.
  • Scharffen Berger makes bittersweet bars, too, with 70% cacao.

Of course, good ol’ semi-sweet chocolate–baking bars and/or chips–will be fine in this recipe, too. Sometimes, you’ve got to go with what’s in your pantry!

Vegetable oil: Any neutral-tasting vegetable oil should be fine. I like canola oil because of its heart-healthy polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Yogurt: This ingredient adds protein, keeps the chocolate muffins moist and helps them rise. For the sake of flavor, it’s best to use low-fat or whole milk. Stay away from non-fat or flavored varieties.

🥚🥚 Eggs: These offer protein, fat, and a host of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients like choline, which helps with healthy brain and liver function, metabolism, and more!

Vegans can replace the yogurt and eggs with plant milk or plant-based yogurt and flaxseed eggs. Below is the recipe for a flax egg. 

  • 1 Tablespoon ground flaxseed meal
  • 3 Tablespoons water
  • Mix in small bowl and let stand for five minutes, until thickened.

How to Make 

Line a muffin tin with paper liners. I like to use parchment liners because they separate from the muffin very easily. For a special occasion, these tulip-shaped liners are nice!

Mix the flours, cocoa, stevia-blend sweetener, espresso powder (if using), baking soda, and salt in a good size bowl. Set aside while you prepare the wet ingredients.

Melt chopped bittersweet chocolate. You can do this in the microwave or set a heatproof bowl over simmering water in a small sauce pan. (See recipe card below for complete instructions.)

Add the sugar, oil, yogurt, and vanilla to melted chocolate and mix well. Then, add the eggs one at a time, beating after each addition. Or, if using flax eggs, add all at once, beating into the mixture.

If you’ve been cracking eggs, wash your hands thoroughly.

Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and mix lightly, leaving some dry, streaky spots. Overmixing is your enemy when it comes to muffin making!

Adding dark chocolate chips to red bowl with chocolatey batter on blue countertop

Lightly mix in the chocolate chips.

Muffin tin with chocolatey batter being scooped into muffin liners with an ice cream scoop

An ice-cream scoop makes it easy to portion the batter into the muffin cups.

Initially bake for eight to 10 minutes at 400 F, then lower the heat to 350 F. Rotate the pan front to back and and bake for another eight minutes.

Lowering the heat is key! It helps the center of the muffin set and prevents the outside from burning. The finished muffin will have a crusty top and be moist inside. 

Remove from oven and let cool in the pan for five minutes before removing to a rack. (Time to sample a warm chocolate muffin with melty chips inside!)

Nutrition Bonuses 🌟

Cocoa flavanols: These phytonutrient, antioxidant compounds found in plants have multitude of health benefits. To reap the rewards, you need at least 200 mg per day.

A recently updated article from ConsumerLab.com* mentioned the following health perks along with the amount of flavanols needed:

  • Better blood flow and cardiovascular disease improvement–minimum of 200 mg/d
  • Blood glucose management–minimum 200 mg/d
  • Cognitive function improvement–minimum 500 mg/d
  • Smoother and tighter skin–minimum 320 mg/d

The same article detailed testing results from several baking chocolates with high levels of flavanols. Ones that could be used in this recipe include:

  • Baker’s Semi-Sweet Chocolate Bar
  • Ghiradelli Intense Dark

ConsumerLab.com recommended the following dark baking chips for high levels of flavanols with less cadmium, a hazardous chemical. (For more info on cadmium, read below.)

  • Guittard Extra Dark Chocolate Baking Chips (top pick)  
  • Ghiradelli Chocolate Premium Baking Chips (better for children)

Ghiradelli Chocolate Premium Baking Cocoa was ConsumerLab.com’s top choice among cocoa powders tested because it offers a good amount of flavanols with less cadmium. 

*ConsumerLab.com may require a paid subscription to view the full report.

Cacao Solids meaning?

According to ConsumerLab.com, the confectionery industry defines cacao solids as the total of cocoa liquor, cocoa powder, and cocoa butter in a product.

Because cocoa butter does not contain flavanols, the percent cacao solids listed is not a reliable way to choose a product . Unsweetened cocoa powder, which has had the cocoa butter removed, is loaded with flavanols.

Health bonuses in 100 grams (3.5 ounces) of dark chocolate

Here are some deets on dark chocolate with 60-69% cacao solids:

  • 8 g fiber
  • 62 mg calcium
  • 6.32 mg iron
  • 176 mg magnesium
  • 2.65 mg zinc
  • 86 mg caffeine
  • 632 mg theobromine

Dark chocolate is rich in minerals!

Stimulants? Yes, no, or maybe?

Caffeine, of course, can make you feel jittery in large amounts. Theobromine is also stimulant with slightly different effects that tend toward focus instead of jitters.

There is research showing that some of the happy feeling you get from eating chocolate is due to the combination of caffeine and theobromine.

cup of coffee with chocolates on a tray on a bedspread

Despite the lift they provide, I would not eat these muffins in the late afternoon, but my husband enjoys them with a glass of milk at bedtime!

A muffin with moderate carbohydrate content

Compared to store-bought chocolate muffins, these Triple Chocolate Muffins have far fewer carbohydrates.

One decent size muffin has only 30 grams (two servings for those who count) if the muffins are made with stevia-blend sweetener plus sugar. About 13 of those grams are from added sugar.

A chocolate muffin from Costco can have 87 grams of carbohydrate, almost three times as many, with 38 grams of added sugar!

Nutritional minuses: fat and cadmium 😟

Triple Chocolate Muffins are not low-fat. Each muffin has 17 grams of fat and is delicious!

The biggest health drawback is cadmium. ConsumerLab.com’s testing found that many chocolates with high concentrations of flavanols also had high concentrations of cadmium. 

Cadmium is a heavy metal found in environment and depending on where you’re getting your information, it’s a probable carcinogen, known to cause cancer.

This is especially true for cadmium in cigarette smoke. It enters the food chain from soils since it’s found in the earth’s crust, fertilizers, and coal. Also, it’s a byproduct of metal extraction. 

Cocoa powders sometimes have a high amount of cadmium.

Ghiradelli Chocolate Premium Baking Cocoa has a lower cadmium concentration to go with its higher flavanols, which makes it a healthy choice for baking. The downside is that it’s expensive.

How to store and reheat 🔥

The muffins are fine to store at room temperature for a day or two, and will keep in the refrigerator for up to five days.

(As they age, they become more crumbly.)

You can freeze them for up to two months.

In the microwave, heat a frozen muffin for 45 seconds. A muffin from the refrigerator will need about 20 seconds, and a room temperature muffin might need 15 seconds (to melt the chocolate chips).

Note: Microwave ovens vary in power, so your oven may perform slightly differently than above.

Truly, they are best eaten on the day they are baked. It’s probably a good idea to pop any leftovers (if there are any) in the freezer at the end of the day. 

When to eat ⏰

Enjoy the muffins for breakfast, brunch, or an afternoon pick-me-up. They could also be dessert, but be mindful of the caffeine and theobromine content. (Although this has not been an issue for my husband! 😄)

With a cup of coffee or tea in the morning, they are very energizing!

Other chocolate recipes

If you are trying to get your 200 mg per day dose of chocolate without resorting to supplements like CocoVia, or swallowing straight spoonfuls of cocoa powder, here are more recipes you might like:

No-bake Chocolate Pie is a quick dessert win made in the microwave!

Chocolate Protein Pancakes are a recovery meal that doubles as a delicious brunch! (Your grandma needs these pancakes, too. You don’t have to tell her about the protein part.)

My blog with an erythritol brownies recipe gives the low-down on this no-calorie, no-carbohydrate sweetener and how it’s combined with stevia to make easily digestible, healthy treats.

Or, make a few scones for brunch. Try these tea-infused Earl Grey Scones or super-quick Blackberry Scones.

Chocolate muffin with white chocolate drizzle cut in half with muffin in background
Print

Triple Chocolate Muffins

Decadent, dark, and delicious–these muffins are the pinnacle of chocolate perfection with surprising health perks!
Course Breakfast, brunch, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine Any
Keyword antioxidants, chocolate, muffins, quick bread
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 18 minutes
Cooling time 5 minutes
Total Time 38 minutes
Servings 12
Calories 268.1kcal
Author Jani H. Leuschel

Equipment

  • 1 12-cup muffin tin
  • paper liners or non-stick baking spray
  • 1 large bowl
  • 1 2-cup glass measure like Pyrex or Anchor Hocking
  • measuring spoons and cups
  • spatulas and whisks

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup whole-wheat pastry flour
  • ½ cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup stevia-blend sweetener, check label to be sure that the sweetener measures spoon for spoon like sugar. You can sub regular sugar.
  • ¼ cup cocoa powder, natural, not Dutch-processed
  • 1 teaspoon espresso powder, optional
  • ¾ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 4 ounces chopped bittersweet chocolate
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • ½ cup canola oil or vegetable oil
  • ½ cup low-fat Greek yogurt, whole milk or plant-based yogurt is fine, too. Don't use non-fat.
  • 2 eggs, sub flax eggs if vegan. See notes below for flax egg instruction.
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 cup chocolate chips, bittersweet (dark)

Instructions

  • Wash hands for 20 seconds before beginning prep.
  • Heat the oven to 400 F and place paper liners in a 12-cup muffin tin. I like to use parchment liners because they separate easily from the muffin.
    Or, spray each muffin cup in the tin with non-stick baking spray.
  • In a large bowl, combine the flours, cocoa powder, stevia-blend sweetener, espresso powder (if using), baking soda, and salt.
  • Place the chopped bittersweet chocolate In a small microwave-safe bowl or measuring cup, Microwave on medium power for 30 seconds and stir. Microwave an additional 30 seconds on medium power and stir.
    If the chocolate is still chunky, microwave in 20-second bursts on medium power until mostly melted.
    If there are still a few chocolate lumps in the meltiness, no worries. It should become completely liquid with gentle stirring.
    Alternatively, you can melt the chocolate in a heatproof bowl set over a saucepan of barely simmering water.
  • Remove the bowl from the microwave or saucepan and stir in the sugar. Add the oil, yogurt, and vanilla. Thoroughly combine.
    Beat in the eggs one at a time, taking care that the mixture is not so warm that they scramble. Wash hands after handling eggs.
    (This is not a concern if you substitute with flaxseed eggs.)
  • Pour the liquid ingredients into the dry ingredients and stir gently, taking care not to overmix. (It's okay if there are a couple of dry, streaky spots in the batter.)
  • Gently stir in the bittersweet chips.
  • Use an ice cream scoop to generously fill paper liners in the muffin pan. Insert the pan into the middle rack of the preheated oven.
  • Bake for 10 minutes and then turn the oven down to 350 F. Rotate the pan front to back and bake for another eight minutes.
    Remove the pan from the oven and let the muffins cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then remove them to a wire rack. Decorate with melted chocolate (white, dark, or milk), if desired.
  • Serve at breakfast or brunch. They are also delicious as a snack or dessert!

Notes

Sweetener: Sometimes baking with stevia sweeteners can be challenging. Truvia and others usually combine stevia with erythritol, but they are often not quite as sweet as sugar. If you prefer to use all sugar, that should work just fine.
It’s important to read the package on the stevia sweetener to know whether it measures the same as sugar or if you should use half as much. This recipe is written for a product that measures equally. 
Cocoa powder: I prefer natural cocoa powder, such as Scharffen Berger or Ghiradelli Premium Baking Cocoa (unsweetened) for their lively chocolate flavor. If you want to use a Dutch-processed cocoa powder, add ½ teaspoon of baking powder to the recipe and reduce the baking soda to ½ teaspoon.
Flax eggs: For each egg you are replacing, combine one tablespoon flaxseed meal with three tablespoons of water. Allow the flax egg to sit for five minutes and thicken before using.
Close-up of two chocolate muffins with icing drizzle on cooling rack

Credit: Jani H. Leuschel

 
♦The muffins are done if the middle is set and only a couple of crumbs stick to a toothpick inserted into the center.

Nutrition

Serving: 1muffin | Calories: 268.1kcal | Carbohydrates: 29.5g | Protein: 4.4g | Fat: 16.8g | Saturated Fat: 5.3g | Cholesterol: 30.6mg | Sodium: 183.8mg | Potassium: 73.7mg | Fiber: 3.9g | Sugar: 12.9g | Vitamin A: 45.7IU | Vitamin C: 0mg | Calcium: 21mg | Iron: 1.9mg

Copyright © 2022 Jani H. Leuschel

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